Cargo Ship Fire Might Have Destroyed Some of the Final Lamborghini Aventadors

Lamborghini’s V12 supercar is going out of production this year, but some of the last units might’ve just burned to a crisp in the Felicity Ace fire.

byVictoria Scott| UPDATED Feb 23, 2022 2:08 PM
Cargo Ship Fire Might Have Destroyed Some of the Final Lamborghini Aventadors
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Aftermath of the toasted car-carrying cargo ship Felicity Ace continues to reveal itself. Now we know the boat, which was confirmed to contain nearly 4,000 Porsches, Bentleys, Audis, and VWs, also had one more brand's products onboard: Lamborghini. Automotive News interviewed Andrea Baldi, Lamborghini of America CEO, and he confirmed there are "dozens" of Raging Bulls aboard the now-charred ship

According to Baldi, every Lamborghini involved was already pre-sold to customers. The majority of them were Urus SUVs, the brand's best-seller. Additionally, he confirmed there were multiple Huracans and Aventadors involved in the mess. Some customers had been waiting for up to a year to take delivery of their Lamborghinis, with Baldi admitting the situation won't be resolved right away. 

"We will inform the customers as soon as we have a definitive picture," he continued, noting it'll be impossible to tell how heavily impacted buyers will be until salvage efforts determine the extent of the damage.

Lamborghini

The fact that multiple Aventadors were inside the Felicity Ace further complicates things for the Italian automaker. Every remaining Aventador slated for production has already been spoken for by customers, and the car itself is being phased completely out for its as-yet-unnamed successor. In the interview, Baldi admitted that if any Aventadors were destroyed, Lamborghini would need to contact its suppliers to see if more could even be built.

Salvage efforts aren't underway just yet, although crews are expected to board the damaged adrift ship as early as Wednesday to begin recovery efforts, per Automotive News. Until that happens and the full extent of the damage is surveyed, no one—not even Baldi himself—has any idea how many, if any at all, of the cars survived.

Furthermore, thanks to prominent car collector Don_Huayra on Instagram, we can confirm there was at least one Huracán STO onboard whose fate will remain unknown for a while longer. In his Instagram post discussing the loss of his car, he said he'd already waited a year for his order to arrive. Unfortunately for him—and everyone else with a car on board—it's going to be a little while longer until Lamborghini can figure out what happens next.

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