Ram Drops Single-Cab, Short-Bed Pickup, and We’re Already Mourning

What was once the archetypal pickup truck body style is now falling out of favor as Ram winds down its production of its smallest truck.

byJames Gilboy| UPDATED Oct 12, 2022 5:21 PM
Ram Drops Single-Cab, Short-Bed Pickup, and We’re Already Mourning
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Ram will discontinue its single-cab, short-bed truck, ending the once-ubiquitous pickup body style—at least for Ram.

Effectively the iconic pickup body style, the short-bed single-cab has become relatively rare with the popularization of crew cabs, which made up over 80% of the market as of 2020, according to JATO Dynamics data reported by The Truth About Cars. The single-cab is now so niche that Ram doesn't offer one at all on the current 1500, and only offers it on the Ram 1500 Classic (the last-gen model, which is still in production). But the version that pairs the short cab with the shorter, 6-foot-4-inch bed is going by the wayside as a Ram spokesperson confirmed to The Drive.

2022 Ram 1500 Classic single-cab short-bed pickup truck. Ram

Ram's spokesperson didn't have an explanation for the trim's discontinuation at the time, but there are plenty of good guesses. For starters, the single-cab is only available on the Ram 1500 Classic's two lowest trims, meaning its profit margins are limited. It's also possible the shorty Ram didn't fit with Stellantis's CAFE requirements, which are determined not only by vehicles' class but also their physical footprint. With smaller dimensions comes a higher standard for gas mileage, despite being otherwise mechanically identical to larger, only marginally less efficient trucks.

Regardless of why the littlest Ram is going away, the single-cab short-bed pickup isn't yet fading away into memory. Last year, Chevrolet reintroduced its stubbiest Silverado after years of pleading from customers. Ford too offers the spec on its new 2023 Super Duty, which it showed off not just as a single-cab short-bed, but as a dually at that. Though Ram may no longer fly the single-cab flag, its rivals are stepping in to fill its shoes, and Ram's going to have its work cut out for it if it ever decides to reverse course.

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