1950 Chevy Truck With Tiny Home Camper Is the Most American Way to Travel

And since it's for sale, you can take it on the road trip you've been planning for months.

Bruce Emehiser via Facebook Marketplace

Everyone wishes they could get away for one reason or another—right now, there are plenty of reasons. But there are better, more memorable ways to travel the nation than behind the massive wheel of an RV, and that's in your own camper truck. If you want to spend a fortune buying a new rig and kitting it with all the latest gear then go for it, though this humble 1950 Chevy 3600 has what most everyone needs for $13,500.

The formula behind this classic is perfectly simple. Straight-six power, supposedly from Chevy's venerable 235-cubic-inch engine, is sent to the rear wheels—none of that 4x4 mumbo jumbo. There's a bench seat inside the cab and a metal dash, all of which the seller claims to be original, and the same goes for the running gear. It's a numbers-matching example according to the ad, making this three-quarter-ton truck pretty darn nice.

At the risk of sounding too much like an HGTV host, the camper is actually more of a tiny home with mid-century amenities. That's a kind way of saying it has a dated interior, though it really doesn't matter much. You want this for the nostalgia and memories of your youth. If your parents or grandparents didn't have a floral-patterned mattress cover, then hit the bricks.

Just kidding.

Nicely stained wood is everywhere, and you're not pressed for space, either. I'd say this is more suited for a weekend trip to the lake, though I happen to know a couple of adventurers who were driving from Argentina to Alaska in an extremely similar '50s Chevy before COVID disrupted their plans. You can check out the first part of their story here.

While you shouldn't expect to climb a mountain or ford through deep rivers in this throwback Chev-ro-let, it's worth buying for the cool factor alone. It should be used too, of course, but it'd be wise to plan on driving it when you aren't pressed for time. One, because it isn't particularly fast and two, because you'll surely be stopped by someone at a gas station whose dad used to have one "just like it."

The listing is currently up on Facebook Marketplace, which pins the location as Latah, Washington. If you're far away, don't let the distance intimidate you—it's worth the drive.

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