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Regular 2012 Ram 1500 With a Hellcat Swap Is a Total Sleeper for $50,000

It's like if Ram built the TRX a decade ago and decided to make it a street truck instead of a desert runner.
Juan Carlos Toscano

I’m a simple man. I like trucks. I especially like trucks built by people with a vision to create something cool from something ordinary. That perfectly sums up this Hellcat-swapped 2012 Ram 1500 that’s for sale right now. It may not be an off-road hero like the factory-built TRX, but it’s one heck of a sleeper that lets people in on the secret with a thick pair of Hoosiers out back.

The pickup is listed in Pasadena, Texas for $50,000. That isn’t cheap but for the money, you could only cover about half the cost of a new Hellcat truck, so I’m calling it a win. It’s an especially good deal considering plenty of work went into building this engine above and beyond its factory power levels.

Aside from the tune that helps run E85 fuel, this street rig has upgraded upper and lower pulleys for the blower, ARH long tube headers, a custom-spec camshaft, a Modern Muscle Xtreme dual fuel hat, and what sounds like a Forced Inductions Interchiller to keep the intake air super cold. There aren’t any dyno numbers mentioned in the listing, but I’d almost bet this Ram makes more power at the tires than the Hellcat did at the crank when stock.

That educated guess is supported by the fact that the truck runs three-piece wheels all around with big Hoosier QTP road-legal tires wrapped around the rears. Look underneath and you’ll also find a custom two-piece driveshaft, Inez rear control arm brackets, an adjustable track bar, and other key suspension parts like dial-in shocks, Core 4×4 upper and lower control arms, and a lowering kit that drops the front four inches and the rear two inches. Even the brakes are upgraded to 15-inch Wilwoods.

The seller says Texas House of Hemi did all the engine work, so it was professionally assembled. That’s reassuring for anyone who’s actually interested in coughing up $50,000 on what’s still someone else’s project. If it really does run like what’s shown in the Facebook Marketplace listing, it makes a strong case for itself. You probably aren’t going to build one of these for less, and as if you needed icing on the cake, it’s a big daddy Laramie Longhorn model with the fancy leather.

What more convincing do you need?

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