Bugatti’s $4.7M Track-Focused Bolide Concept Will Head to Production

Bugatti’s quad-turbo engine nestled in a stripped-back, purpose-built track special? Yes please.

byLewin Day| UPDATED Aug 13, 2021 11:17 PM
Bugatti’s $4.7M Track-Focused Bolide Concept Will Head to Production
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As lesser mainstream automakers slim down their offerings to appeal to an increasingly picky buying public, Bugatti is doing anything but. After showing off the track-focused Bolide concept late last year, the hypercar builder realized there was pent-up demand for a Bugatti track special. Thus, Bugatti decided—the Bolide will soon enter production, with deliveries set for 2024.

Update: 8/13/21 11:13 p.m. ET: Bugatti have confirmed the Bolide is intended for track use only, and thus will not be road legal.

The Bolide leverages the same 8.0-liter, 16-cylinder, quad turbo engine as the Chiron, though in this case tuned to an output of 1,600 HP with the help of new turbos and a host of other tweaks. It’s slightly down from the 1,824 HP figure quoted for the concept, but the production model will run on regular premium gas rather than 110 octane race fuel. 

Bugatti

Unlike other Bugatti special editions, many of which are based entirely on the Chiron, the Bolide has a shape and design all its own. Built for outright performance, it sports a huge front splitter and a gigantic rear wing, along with a suitably aggressive diffuser at the rear. With so much power on tap, generating major downforce is absolutely essential.

Bugatti

There’s also a roof scoop ducting air to the engine bay. It’s perhaps the ultimate design feature to lean on when you want to indicate a car is built for the track above all else. The outer skin of the scoop reportedly morphs at speed to reduce drag and better guide air to the rear wing. 

Bugatti

Further highlighting this singular focus is the curb weight of just 3,196 pounds. It’s a touch heavier than the 2,734 pounds of the concept. However, it comes in far lighter than the estimated 4400 lb weight of the Chiron Pur Sport, the most nimble and light-footed member among its broader family. 

Bugatti

Designing a track car from the ground up has also allowed Bugatti to add features that would be out of place on a car like the Chiron. The car’s fuel bladder supports pressure refueling, while the wheels are a centerlock design with fins to help cool the brakes.  Finally, there’s an automatic fire extinguisher system as well as a six-point harness with HANS system compatibility to save your neck in the event of a crash.

The uncompromising track car has been in development for some time, with Bugatti releasing simulated performance figures for the original concept late last year. Claiming a potential top speed of over 500 km/h, and a Nürburgring time of 5:23.1, just shy of the all-time record, it's clear the hopes are high for the Bolide. Of course, the production model loses some horsepower to the concept and adds a bit of weight, but it should still be ferociously quick.

If you want to snuggle into the molded carbon-fiber buckets of the Bolide, you’ll have to pony up approximately $4.7 million dollars for the privilege. The production run will stretch to just 40 units, nonetheless a significant number for a car initially designed as a concept only. Bugatti’s press release doesn’t mention whether or not the Bolide will be road legal. However, given the extreme prototype-like design, and noting there’s no room for a number plate in any of the photos, we suspect it won't be.

Bugatti's lineup has not exactly left drivers wanting for speed. However, putting that monstrous powerplant and all-wheel-drive system into a lightweight track-ready chassis is surely a recipe for greatness. Actual performance figures aren’t out yet, but if they get anywhere near the simulated figures stated earlier on, the Bolide should be an absolute ball tearer. 

Got a tip? Let me know: lewin@thedrive.com