Ever Seen a $75,000 Ford Mustang Fox-Body?

Nostalgia commands a premium, apparently.

Via Craigslist

The Ford Mustang has had its hits...and misses. Luckily, the Fox-Body SVT Cobra fits in the former category. Its specially tuned 302-cubic-inch V8 not only had an upgraded exhaust and intake but also improved cylinder heads, helping output along to 235 horsepower in total. What's more, they were fairly rare. This 1993 example for sale on Boston Craigslist is one of just 4,994 cars built for that model year, though it's almost certainly the most valuable of the bunch. That's what happens when you drive just 255 miles over 27 years.

Discovered online by the crew at Barn Finds, this teal SVT Cobra still sports its factory plastic covering an Opal Grey leather interior. You won't find a speck of dirt under the hood, either; this baby has been garage-kept in a private collection all these years. It's as if someone had just taken delivery of it, but only after picking up a Journey's Greatest Hits tape at the store beforehand. 

Via Craigslist

When new, the SVT Cobra was capable of a 5.7-second zero to 60 time. More importantly, it could scurry down the quarter-mile in 14.5 seconds with loads of mods out there to improve that figure. I can just about promise you this car has never been full-throttle for more than a few seconds, let alone 14.5, but I digress. At least its storage environment was nice and climate-controlled—the paint looks A1 while the alloy wheels appear to be in like-new condition. It does still wear its factory tires, though, so the buyer will want to switch those out before hitting the road.

Whoever buys it is going to drive it, right?

Via Craigslist

The price is hard to ignore at $75,000, which just so happens to be the entry point for a 2020 Shelby GT500. It's important to note that other SVT Cobras have sold for more, though the high-rolling examples on Bring a Trailer were both Cobra "R" models. Those are significantly rarer and have a cult-like collector following.

Via Craigslist

Who's to say if the car in question will actually command that price. In the end, it's only worth what someone will pay for it. Just don't be surprised if a well-to-do hardware store chain owner comes along and throws down 75 stacks for it.

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