Tesla-Powered 1977 Porsche 911 RWB Sends 563 HP to the Rear Wheels

Although this classic is a purebred show car, it also has the speed to back up its on-point aesthetics.

Streetfighter_LA via Instagram

Porsche purists might be the most die-hard enthusiasts of them all and for that, the builder of this Tesla-powered, wide-bodied 1977 911 will surely face plenty of hate. No matter, though, because this battery-powered classic sports car now makes 563 horsepower to the wheels with immediate throttle response and deceivingly silent speed.

Though the build isn't new—it was originally completed in 2018—it's just now getting its moment in the spotlight at this year's SEMA show in Las Vegas. California-based tuners StreetFighter LA helped build the car, which had already been upgraded with a bodykit from famed Porsche masters Rauh Welt Begriff (RWB). The 911 was then overhauled with help from EV West, a San Marcos-based shop that specializes in gas-to-electric conversions. All in, the car produces 563 horsepower at the wheels, which supposedly makes it the most powerful RWB car ever. 

One of the best parts of this 911 is that the EV West conversion didn’t require any modifications to the car's body or chassis, and it even uses the factory mounting holes in the engine bay. This saves the P-car from being a hack job of sorts and shows the build's overall quality.

 

The Tesla powertrain makes almost three times more power than the Porsche's factory flat-six engine once did, so the team made modifications to the suspension system with a fully adjustable setup from Elephant Racing. It’s a GT3-inspired suspension package that gives the car its slammed stance and helps get power to the ground more effectively.

 

RWB is a Porsche tuner located in Japan and is known for combining Japanese and classic Euro elements in their vehicles. The company’s 911s are completely bespoke, one-off creations that are made to order for each customer. RWB’s founder, Akira Nakai, has held public builds and exhibitions where he fully customizes a 911 while a crowd looks on—he even used The Drive's garage in 2016 to create one of his masterpieces. Purists have been known to complain about the cars Nakai turns out, saying that they don’t always represent the personality and spirit that Porsche originally intended but, tradition aside, RWB Porsches usually look damn good.