Flooded 2022 Maserati MC20 for Sale Probably Just Needs To Be Put in Rice

Italian cars are known to have questionable wiring from the factory. After being submerged in water, it might have actually improved.

byPeter Holderith| PUBLISHED Nov 1, 2022 1:30 PM
Flooded 2022 Maserati MC20 for Sale Probably Just Needs To Be Put in Rice
Copart
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Maserati's new V6-powered MC20 supercar is an impressive and expensive machine. If you don't have arounlying,000 laying around to get one, you might be tempted by the fact that one is for sale on Copart right now in Florida, another victim of Hurricane Ian. It's flooded but also wholly intact. It just looks a little, uhh, moist. It's probably a good idea to buy it on the cheap, right? Well...

Even if you have a dumpster full of rice to dry it out in, It's probably best to leave this 621-horsepower Italian corner carver alone. Flood cars are notoriously prone to electrical gremlins, among other unpleasantries, and just because it's cheap doesn't mean it's worth the countless weeks of toil trying to get this thing running again. It is, in a nutshell, a very good-looking parts car.

The Copart listing likewise states the MC20 has secondary mechanical damage, although it doesn't go into detail about that, and it's unclear if the vehicle runs. If someone tried to start the car after it was flooded, it might have severe engine damage. The whole thing is a big unknown, and Copart's estimated retail value of the vehicle at about $260,000 seems a little ambitious as a result. The current bid sits at $5,200, which is more like it.

Given that, the parts that might be intact are tempting. For instance, the car's 3.0-liter Nettuno V6 has passive pre-chamber ignition that helps it create its impressive level of horsepower. Likewise, I bet those wheels fit a Honda Accord. Do you have an Accord? Just think of the possibilities.

The interior is also intact, and the key is still with the car, so assuming it can be fixed, it can be driven without further electronic fiddling. All of this being said, don't do it. It's an expensive lawn ornament at best. Some parts are worth money, but finding a buyer is easier said than done.

If you still want this thing, bidding ends at 10 a.m. EST Nov. 3. That gives you two days to make up your mind.

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