Tesla Removes 2022 Cybertruck Production Date From Its Site

It could hint at further delays to the company’s electric pickup.

byLewin DayJan 4, 2022 8:46 PM
Tesla Removes 2022 Cybertruck Production Date From Its Site
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The Tesla Cybertruck has hardly left the headlines since it was first announced, known for its controversial design and a seemingly-vague date to enter production. That only looks set to continue, as Tesla has now removed any references to the vehicle's production deadline from its own website. 

The move has sparked speculation that Tesla will not meet its earlier-cited estimate of building the Cybertruck in 2022. Production was originally supposed to start sooner than this year, but reports of delays came to light in August 2021 as the company sought to focus on the Model Y. 

It bears noting that there's no official word from Tesla regarding a delay. Neither has CEO Elon Musk commented on the change. The Drive has not reached out to Tesla for comment, as the company famously does not maintain a public relations department. The company has form in this area, regularly making changes to its marketing materials and website without a corresponding official announcement. 

Alternatively, it may just be a minor change in wording. Previously, the reservation page for the Cybertruck stated that customers could complete their order when "production nears in 2022." It may simply be that now we are in 2022, someone at Tesla saw fit to remove the reference. 

However, the vagueness seems to give Tesla an out on precisely when the Cybertruck will actually be built en masse. Earlier statements from Musk indicated the pickup would only enter production in late 2022, with a ramp to higher volumes in 2023. It would not be surprising if that deadline had slipped further, particularly given the present intensity of the global pandemic and ongoing chip shortages faced by the industry. 

In any case, it's another sign that suggests it will be a while before you'll catch a Cybertruck on roads near you. With competitors like the Ford F-150 Lightning just around the corner, and the Rivian R1T already out and about, it seems like Tesla might be a little late to the start of the electric pickup party.

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