Buy This Lamborghini Countach-Inspired ‘Car’ Instead of a Cybertruck

The United Nude Lo-Res actually predates the Cybertruck by several years, so there's that.

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Good news to anyone in the state of California who's looking to get into geometric crime. The United Nude Lo-Res has been put up for auction on Bring a Trailer, which is perfect if you want to wreck up Batman or something while staying compliant with emissions standards. Likewise, it's the perfect Tesla Cybertruck substitute since you can actually buy it.

The Lo Res is legitimately one of my favorite cars so the bad news is you're gonna have to outbid me—the good news is journalism doesn't pay so well. It's yet another EV made by a non-conventional automaker, the industry disruption this time coming from the unlikely source of an Amsterdam-based design house that makes kinda weirdo shoes.

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That may not seem like the most probable source for a glowing, clearly malevolent car that might as well be trying to deck Tokyo-3 in Evangelion but this is a real vehicle and one of several that United Nude made. The one listed on Bring a Trailer right now—no reserve, so help me—is Chassis #03 and has been chilling at the Petersen Automotive Museum, so you can bet it's had careful owners. 

It's powered by a single, rear-axle-mounted, five-kilowatt electric motor, so it looks cool but isn't going to go anywhere fast. Then again, why would you need to? The way you get in is via the entire top half opening like a sinister clam and it has two seats, for you and your sidekick. 

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The really interesting thing about the Lo-Res is how it was designed. United Nude founder Rem D Koolhaas took an image of the Lamborghini Countach and basically messed it up; the name of the car comes from lowering the resolution until this, the pixelated shape of the most basic Countach outline, was formed. 

It won a design award in 2016 and that's about all the documentation you're gonna get on it. Sadly, it is, of course, a museum piece and not actually legal for use on public roads. Proceeds of whatever it eventually sells for will go 50-50 between the museum and a clean air charity, so you can offset the guilt about your massive super crimes just fine. 

Got a genuinely villainous car? Show me on hazel@thedrive.com