There's a Wrecked $400,000 Rolls-Royce Cullinan Wasting Away in a Chicago Salvage Yard

The ultra-lux SUV has just 3,000 miles on the clock along with custom upgrades galore. Oh yeah, and a ton of front-end damage

Copart

YouTube personality Samcrac toured a Chicago-area salvage yard in a recent video and came across quite the treasure: A wrecked Rolls-Royce Cullinan with a full custom interior and paint job, boasting just 3,000 miles on the odometer. There's plenty here to be curious about, considering that these are more often found parked along Rodeo Drive in Hollywood rather than a Midwestern Copart.

The Cullinan is the British luxury brand’s first SUV, and though it’s got a starting price of around $345,000, nobody buys a Rolls-Royce without tacking on at least a BMW 7-Series’ MSRP worth of options. The one thing that all models have in common is a twin-turbo, 6.75-liter V-12 engine and a ZF eight-speed automatic transmission that sends power through a permanent all-wheel-drive system. 

 

The wrecked Cullinan from the video, which pops up around the 14-minute mark, is missing its front passenger-side quarter panel and has significant damage to the wheel and front grille area on that side. Luckily, the airbags didn’t deploy in the collision and the interior appears to be in fairly good shape. That’s good news because someone went crazy with custom options on this SUV. There’s an orange-accented and custom-stitched leather interior, matching orange pinstriped paint, and (of course) orange and black wheels to tie everything together.

 

The video presenter doesn’t mention an auction starting price and moves onto another salvage vehicle without batting an eye, so we headed over to Copart's website for more info. The current highest bid sits at $91,000, or a little over a quarter of the SUV's base price. 

It wouldn’t be surprising to see a repair bill in the five figures to replace custom wheels and match the factory paint, but with just over 3,000 miles on the clock, this one might be worth the effort to restore.