RC Plows and Snowblowers Are the Fun Way to Clear Your Driveway

It’s a fun way to handle an otherwise frustrating chore.

byLewin DayJan 12, 2022 10:03 PM
RC Plows and Snowblowers Are the Fun Way to Clear Your Driveway
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It's winter time again, and for those in the snowy regions, that means breaking out the shovel to clear out driveways and paths on the regular. A man by the name of Henry found a way to inject a little joy into the tiresome task, however, putting his fleet of RC trucks to work instead and sharing the videos on Youtube.

The work starts with a Traxxas TRX4 wearing the body of a classic Ford Bronco. Serving as the plow truck, its job is to scrape snow off the driveway, capable of dealing with an inch or more of the white stuff. Fitted with a stout 5.5 Ah battery, Henry is able to plow for up to 2 hours non-stop before recharging.

Helping out is a Traxxas TRX6 wearing a Mercedes G63 6x6 body. It's outfitted with a snowblower attachment, and Henry has a great collection of videos of it in action on the driveway. It's capable of chewing up inches of snow, directing it out in a powerful stream to neatly remove it from the driveway. It seems to work best in concert with the Bronco, with the snowblower better at moving bulk snow while the plow does a great job of scraping right down to the surface.  

The snowblower attachment itself was designed by Ryan Butler of Spyker Workshop, and is capable of chewing up several inches of snow and directing it into neat piles via a nozzle. Butler is known in his local area for clearing neighbor's driveways with his larger RC snowblower designs, built on tracked chassis for better grip, as covered by MPR News.

The key to getting the job done is having the right hardware. Henry's RC cars are all stout, hobby-grade rock crawlers, with plenty of grip and tons of torque. Simply bolting a plow on to a toy from Walmart won't be anywhere near as effective. We've seen ready-to-go RC snowplows before; prices can range above $2500 for some of the more nicely equipped models.

As a bonus, hobby-grade hardware is much easier to modify by adding on extra servos to handle things like raising and lowering a plow or activating a snowblower. Get yourself a 3D printer and you can even start designing your own attachments. 

The aesthetic of Henry's gear couldn't be cuter, either. The trucks are authentic replicas of the real thing, with the lighting onboard adding plenty to the vibe. It also makes the trucks easier to find if they do get left outside and covered in a little snow.

Few of us relish the task of heading out in the cold to shovel pounds of snow off the drive. Sitting back on the porch under a blanket with an RC transmitter in hand sounds much preferable, with the prospect of a hot mug of cocoa only a further enticing bonus. If you're tired of the backbreaking labor yourself, consider building a little fleet of vehicles to do the work for you.

Got a tip? Let the author know: lewin@thedrive.com