Beautiful 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Is Going to Fetch at Least Like $10 at Barrett-Jackson

It's going to be a bidding war.

275gtb auction lead
Barret-Jackson

Classics worth well into the six- or even seven-figure range are often too far out of reach to really be interesting, but there are, of course, exceptions. Some ultra-expensive cars stay relevant with interesting engineering while others have interesting stories behind them. In this case, the 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 coming up for sale at Barret-Jackson doesn't really have much of either. 

Sure, it's got a stick shift bolted up to a 300-horsepower quad-cam V12, but its value comes from somewhere else. To put it simply, it's one of the purest-looking sports cars ever built.

Barret-Jackson

The 275 GTB/4 is one of those Ferraris that occasionally fetch seven-figure sums. Back in 2014, one was sold for $27,500,000 at auction, becoming the most expensive Ferrari ever sold. This car was later eclipsed by the current record-holder for the most expensive Ferrari—and indeed the most expensive car—ever, a $48.4 million, 1962 Ferrari GTO which sold at an RM Sotheby's auction back in 2018. The likely astronomical price this 275 will sell for is really only one interesting part of this car, though.

The Scaglietti-built body is mostly steel, but with an aluminum hood, trunk, and doors to keep it light. The aforementioned quad-cam V12 is 3.3-liters and sends power to the rear wheels only via a five-speed manual transaxle. Weighing just 2,866 pounds, 300 horsepower was plenty, and the noise from the tailpipes is certainly better than any radio Ferrari offered at the time. This engine is also part of the car's aesthetic value, as beneath the air cleaner are six two-barrel Weber carburetors to feed all of the hungry cylinders. Nothing like a bunch of Webers to class up an engine bay.

This particular Ferrari has been owned by several different people, as is common with classic cars of this sort. It's been restored once before back in the early 2000s, and it has recently received a fresh engine rebuild by its current owners. It may be an old Ferrari, but look at the pictures. It's as good as new.

It has documentation to prove its provenance, as well as a few other original items of interest like a toolkit—that likely hasn't seen much use—and an original brochure. The car has 60,000 miles, which is actually pretty reasonable for a vehicle like this. Since it's a 1967 model, that adds up to around 1,100 miles per year, so at least somebody has driven the thing and it's not just a static automotive investment.

If you would like to buy it—or just imagine buying it and gape at the price like me—you can place a bid online at Barrett-Jackson's website. I was actually going to but I just don't like the color.

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