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Best Motorcycle Sunglasses: Stop the Squint

Stop squinting with the sun and dirt in your eye and put a pair of sunglasses on already.

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BYAndra DelMonico/ LAST UPDATED ON May 24, 2022

I wear a tinted mirrored visor on my full-face helmet and sunglasses underneath it. It is safe to say that my eyes are sensitive to bright lights. Without this setup, I find myself squinting and eventually getting a migraine — not a fun way to end a day of riding. So the challenge is to find the best motorcycle sunglasses that protect my eyes, fit inside my helmet, and look good enough to wear when I get off the bike. After all, who wants to carry around two pairs of sunglasses when they ride? Not me. So isn't it time you stopped squinting and started seeing better?

Best Overall

Bobster Capone Sunglasses

Summary
These cool sunglasses feature a dark tint and classic cool guy style.  
Pros
  • Includes a microfiber pouch
  • RX ready
Cons
  • No side coverage
  • Might not fit helmet
Best Value

Epoch Eyewear Foam Black Sunglasses

Summary
You don’t have to spend a fortune to have protection and better eyesight.  
Pros
  • Anti-fog coating
  • Wide field of vision
Cons
  • Red can distort colors 
  • Temple tips can slip
Honorable Mention

Harley-Davidson Tat Skull Gasket Sunglasses

Summary
Look tough and mysterious in these sleek black and super dark frames.  
Pros
  • Removable foam seals
  • Silver flash coating
Cons
  • Fits medium to large heads
  • Solid frame blocking peripheral view
Best Motorcycle Sunglasses: Stop the Squint

Summary List 

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Our Methodology

When creating a list of the best motorcycle sunglasses, I wanted to find pairs that were both good-looking and protective. They needed to be from a trusted brand to ensure they wouldn't fall apart in a few weeks. It was also important to me that the sunglasses I chose were safe. The last thing you want is for your sunglasses to be the thing that injuries you. Sunglasses that have UV protection and are not shatterproof were immediately eliminated. The Drive strives to only recommend safe and reliable products. I wanted to find a variety of styles, so I looked at several different websites geared toward different types of riding. I also wanted to include sunglasses at all price points and had specialty features, such as being prescription compatible. 

Best Motorcycle Sunglasses Reviews & Recommendations

Specs

  • Frame Style: Wayfarer
  • Lens Color: Smoke
  • Safety Rating: ANSI Z80.3 CE

Pros

  • Anti-fog lenses
  • 100% UV protection
  • Includes a microfiber pouch
  • RX ready

Cons

  • No side coverage
  • Might not fit helmets with small face opening

These super dark sunglasses have a smoked-out finish on the polycarbonate lenses. They have classic styling that makes them cool enough to wear when you are not on the bike. A neat microfiber lens cleaner comes with the sunglasses to keep them safe when you are not wearing them. It isn't just good looks with these lenses, though; they meet ANSI Z80.3 CE safety standards and are 100 percent UV protective. The anti-fog coating keeps the lenses clear so you can always see. What makes them stand out is that they are perception lens ready, so you do not have to sacrifice style just because you wear glasses.

One drawback of these sunglasses is that they lack side protection or foam backing. Unfortunately, this leaves your eyes exposed to wind and airborne debris.

Specs

  • Frame Style: Sport
  • Lens Color: Red
  • Safety Rating: ANSI Z87.1

Pros

  • 100 percent UVA/UVB protection
  • Foam-backed
  • Anti-fog coating
  • Wide field of vision

Cons

  • Red can distort colors
  • Temple tips can slip

Not everyone wants dark, smoked-out lenses, and that is where these sunglasses come in. They have red shatterproof polycarbonate lenses that provide 100 percent UVA and UVB protection and plenty of peripheral vision. These durable frames meet ANSI Z87.1 safety standards. What I like about these sunglasses is the cushioned foam lining, making the glasses super soft against your face. The red lenses will make everything seem sharper, and you'll have clearer vision when looking at objects at a distance. The low-profile design of these sunglasses makes them universally compatible with helmets.

The red color can distort some colors, making it hard to distinguish some of the objects in front of you. The temple tips on the arms can also slip around on your head.

Specs

  • Frame Style: Wrap-around rectangle
  • Lens Color: Smoke gray
  • Safety Rating: ANSI Z87

Pros

  • Removable foam seals
  • Classic skull emblem
  • Silver flash coating
  • Patented facial cavity seals

Cons

  • Fits medium to large heads
  • Solid frame blocking peripheral view

Sure, these are Harley sunglasses, but they don’t look like typical Harley gear. The only giveaway is a subtle skull detail on the side. You could wear these even if you don’t ride a Harley. They have a solid plastic frame and polycarbonate lens that meet ANSI Z87 safety standards. Patented facial cavity seals eliminate gaps around your eyes for complete protection. What makes these sunglasses stand out is that the seals are removable. You can lock them in place while riding and then take them off when you get to your destination.

Unfortunately, you need a big head to wear these, as they are sized for medium to large heads sizes. These will be too big to be comfortable if your head is on the smaller side. The large solid frame can also block your peripheral view.

Specs

  • Frame Style: Sport
  • Lens Color: Red RV lens
  • Safety Rating: ANSI Z87.1

Pros

  • Wind reducing design
  • 100 percent UV protection
  • No distortion
  • Foam-backed

Cons

  • Bulky arms can feel uncomfortable in your helmet
  • Red lens can cause color distortion

Always feel secure with these glasses snugly fit against your face. Their sporty design helps them fit against your face for a low profile that will neatly fit under your helmet. They also stand out for their wind-reducing design, allowing air to flow over and around without pulling on them, reducing stress points. There's also a foam backing that cushions the sunglasses against your face and seals up any holes where wind or dirt could get in. The unique design of the wrap-around polycarbonate lens reduces distortion while increasing peripheral vision. In addition, the red RV lens makes it easier to see while protecting your eyes.

One frustrating aspect of these sunglasses is that while the red lens is supposed to improve clarity, it also can create color distortion. In addition, the frame styling on the arms can also create some issues when fitting them.

Specs

  • Frame Style: Classic
  • Lens Color: Eight color options
  • Safety Rating: ANSI Z87.1

Pros

  • HDO Technology
  • XYZ Optics
  • Three-point fit
  • 100 percent protection against UVA, UVB, UVC rays, and blue light

Cons

  • Open sides
  • Expensive

These sunglasses are perfect for someone who doesn't want to look like they are wearing another piece of motorcycle gear. They have classic wayfarer styling and eight mirrored lens designs that give you that cool guy image. They have the basic features you'd expect, including 100 percent UVA, UVB, UVC protection, and an ANSI Z87.1 safety rating. What makes them stand out are the additional features. HDO Technology reduces glare and distortion to reduce eye fatigue and better visual accuracy. In addition, XYZ Optics gives you better peripheral vision, making it safer to see on the sides while riding.

Unfortunately, that cool styling means you sacrifice some protection. The open sides, top, and bottom leaves your eyes exposed to wind and debris. They are also expensive, which can be a problem for someone on a budget or who breaks their sunglasses often.

Specs

  • Frame Style: Biker goggle
  • Lens Color: Smoke and clear
  • Safety Rating: ANSI Z87.1+

Pros

  • UV400 filter
  • Thick, vented EVA foam padding
  • Nose pads
  • Dual injected rubber temple tips

Cons

  • No anti-fog coating
  • Can feel hot

This pair of two glasses solves an age-old problem. You're out riding during the day in your sunglasses, then the sun sets, and your sunglasses are too dark. Wear the smoke-tinted sunglasses during the day and the clear lenses at night. Both pairs come with shatterproof polycarbonate lenses that meet ANSI Z87.1+ standards. Both pairs also have thick, vented EVA foam to seal the glasses to your face. Thanks to the padded nose pieces and shaped arms, you'll find these glasses comfortable to wear all day. The sunglasses also have additional protection, including UV400 protection.

The downside of these glasses is the thick foam lining. It can make these glasses feel hot on your face. They also do not have an anti-fog coating so the foam seal can contribute to fogging and condensation.

Specs

  • Frame Style: Rectangle
  • Lens Color: Brown
  • Safety Rating: ANSI Certified

Pros

  • Bifocal lenses
  • Lens Strength: +3.00
  • UV400 protection
  • Includes a hard case

Cons

  • Bulky arms
  • No foam

As we get older, getting a little help can make life easier. These sunglasses give you that little boost. They have large brown tinted lenses to provide plenty of protection from the sun and a large field of vision. The bifocal feature is tucked neatly away towards the bottom of the polycarbonate lenses. This portion of the lens has a +3.00 strength to make seeing up close easier. What's nice about this unique feature is that it makes seeing your gauges easier without moving your whole head or taking your eyes off the road for too long. It is also not too big, so it won't obstruct your view while looking up and out at the road.

One thing I find disappointing about the lenses is the styling. The arms are large and flat. While you could argue that this creates protection on the sides, it also makes them bulkier to fit under your helmet or straps.

Our Verdict

My top pick for the best motorcycle sunglasses is the Bobster Capone Sunglasses because they have a great style and are safety rated, prescription-ready, and anti-fog. 

For a more affordable option, I suggest the Epoch Eyewear Foam Black Sunglasses because they offer you improved vision while also protecting your eyes from the sun. They are also comfortable to wear. 

Consider Secondhand

When we start shopping for tools and products, we never overlook the secondhand market. In fact, it is usually the first place I look. Whether you’re scrolling through Amazon’s Renewed section, eBay for car parts or tools, or flipping through the pages of Facebook Marketplace and Craigslist, you have hundreds of thousands of used tools, parts, and gear ready to be shipped to your doorstep. Refurbished to like-new status, they’ll be willing to give you many more years of faithful service all while saving you money. 

If those options don’t have what you need, your local salvage yard is great for car parts, while swap meets are a great resource you should tap. Just Google either and head on down.  

Secondhand Tips

To make your secondhand search easier, here are two tips to finding the best deals and making sure your new-to-you stuff wasn’t destroyed by the previous owner. 

  • Look for signs of stress at the hinges because this is where they are likely to break. 
  • Check the lenses for scratches because you do not want to be looking through a mess. 

Things to Consider Before Buying Motorcycle Sunglasses

Style and Shape 

The style, shape, and size of the sunglasses are crucial because this is what determines if they are comfortable or not while wearing them with your helmet. Frames that are too wide, narrow, tall, or bulky can interfere with how your helmet fits around your face. Arms that are too thick will put additional pressure on the sides of your head. These uncomfortable pressure points can be distracting and cause a headache. When it comes to style, this is more about personal preference. However, a sport or wrap-around style offers the most protection and peripheral vision. 

Tint

Most people opt for a dark smoke, but this isn't your only option. You could also have brown, yellow, blue, or red. Remember, the color of the lens is no indication of its ability to block UV rays. Just because it is super dark doesn't mean your eyes are more protected. Additionally, too dark can make it harder to see in low light conditions, such as a storm, tunnel, parking garage, or close to sunset. On the other hand, tinted lenses can provide increased visibility. For example, red lenses are supposed to improve vision by increasing your depth of field. 

Prescription Compatibility 

If you are like me and wear prescription glasses, you have two options. Wear contacts and regular sunglasses, or get prescription lenses to put in your motorcycle sunglasses. I have had both, and I prefer to wear contacts and regular sunglasses. However, I have known people who feel the opposite. If you wear prescription glasses, you can buy motorcycle sunglasses ready for customization with prescription lenses. Even if you do not need full prescription lenses, you may need a little boost, such as reader lenses. A set of bifocal lenses can make it easier to see your gauges up close while riding. 

Motorcycle Sunglasses Pricing 

Expect to spend $30 to $60 for a decent pair of motorcycle sunglasses. You can find a safety-certified pair of sunglasses with a nice tint and durable construction in this price range. While you can find them for cheaper, these are low quality and will let you down, so don’t waste your money. 

You can also find motorcycle sunglasses at much higher price points, in the range of $150 to $250. While these are nice, you don’t need to spend that much to have a nice pair of sunglasses with plenty of features. These high-end sunglasses typically come with a designer name brand attached that you are paying for. 

FAQs 

You’ve got questions. The Drive has answers.

Q: Can you wear regular sunglasses on a motorbike?

A: Technically, you can physically wear a pair of regular sunglasses while riding. However, this isn't the smartest option. Regular sunglasses are not designed to wear with a helmet, making them uncomfortable. They also lack safety ratings, making them a safety risk should something unexpected happen while riding.

Q: What do ANSI ratings mean?

A: ANSI refers to the American National Standards Institute, which certifies different types of safety gear and, in this instance, safety glasses. 

Q: Are polarized glasses good for riding motorcycles?

A: While polarized lenses are great for riding during the day, they can be less effective at night. The polarization adds visual clarity and contrast, but the tint makes them too dark. Wearing dark lenses at night reduces visibility, making riding more dangerous.

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