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Refreshed 2025 Chevy Tahoe and Suburban Get Serious Interior Glow Up

Want capability and state-of-the-art tech and luxury? Chevy's upcoming big SUVs don't make you choose.
General Motors

Comfortable, safe cruising and hauling have always been the Chevrolet Tahoe and Suburban’s M.O. But the pair of best-selling full-size SUVs are getting a major glow up for the 2025 model year, and while they look handsome enough from the outside, it’s inside the cabin where the differences immediately become clear.

If you’re a loyalist of GM’s big SUVs, you may spot the nipped-and-tucked fascias on both models. The Tahoe especially looks rugged and purposeful in its Z71 guise. Really, though, it’s really the overhauled cabin flush with new tech that’s the story here. Front and center is a new, ultrawide infotainment touchscreen that measures 17.7 inches diagonally. It’s so big that gear selecting duties have been shuffled back to a stalk, from buttons previously mounted left of the display, next to the climate vents.

Considering the outgoing Tahoe begins at $58,195—GM says it’ll share pricing info on these new 2025 models closer to their on-sale date “late next year”—the comprehensively restyled dash is far more befitting of a premium SUV in this category. Fortunately, while everything’s gotten sleeker, there’s still a breadth of physical buttons flanking the steering wheel. That’s what we like to see.

The updated 3.0-liter Duramax diesel that debuted in the Silverado is now a part of the Tahoe and Suburban ranges as well. This inline-six develops 305 horsepower and 495 lb-ft of torque, improvements of 28 hp and 35 lb-ft over the previous diesel. Chalk up those gains to a retuned turbo, new pistons, higher-flow injectors, and improved cooling overall.

The 5.3-liter V8 remains the standard engine, with an optional 6.2-liter V8 for higher trims. The multilink rear suspension design has been refined, and steering’s been calibrated to further maximize drivability. Chevrolet’s Air Ride Adaptive Suspension will also be made available on the RST trim for the first time. Towing capacity stays at 8,400 pounds for the Tahoe and 8,200 pounds for the Suburban.

The tech onslaught continues. Interior Motion Detection alerts owners to micro-movements in the cabin through sensors, to lessen the dangers of leaving helpless passengers behind. There’s also a new Connected Camera option to view the entirety of the car’s interior and exterior surroundings in 360-degree fashion. Think of it like a dash-cam system, except more fully featured and probably far less painful to deal with because it’s built in. And Super Cruise hands-free driving tech remains on offer, for those in the market for such convenience.

The refreshed Chevrolet Tahoe and Suburban will begin production at GM’s Arlington, Texas plant in the fourth quarter of next year. That means we’ll be waiting quite a while before we see them in the flesh, let alone kick back in that cozy High Country interior.

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