Report: Mid-Engined 2022 Aston Martin Vanquish To Get Manual Transmission (Updated)

Powered by a hybrid twin-turbo V-6, it'll likely be the only new mid-engined supercar that can be had with a stick.

Aston Martin Lagonda

Update, 06/30/2019 9:45 a.m. EDT: When probed for confirmation over whether or not the next Vanquish would indeed have a manual transmission, an Aston Martin spokesperson told The Drive, "It is too early for us to comment any further on the specific technical details of the upcoming Vanquish."

Those who went gaga over that manual Ferrari 458, listen up. A new mid-engined supercar is coming soon and—unlike pretty much all of its competitors—it could be available with three pedals and a stick. The car in question is the upcoming 2022 Aston Martin Vanquish and, according to brand CEO Andy Palmer, it could tick all the boxes for high-end auto fanatics that its Italian rivals simply don’t.

Palmer recently spoke to Australia's Carsales and alluded to the fact that the 2022 Vanquish could be sold with a manual option. 

"I've already made a commitment that I want to be the last manufacturer in the world to offer manual sports cars and I want to honor that commitment," Palmer hinted. 

Previewed by the Vanquish Vision Concept shown off at Geneva earlier this year, the next Vanquish will be a mid-engined supercar instead of a front-engined, long-legged GT like it has been in the past. It'll compete directly against cars like the Ferrari F8 Tributo, McLaren's 720S, and the Lamborghini Huracán, all of which feature seven-speed dual-clutch gearboxes exclusively. 

Aston Martin Lagonda

Aston Martin Vanquish Vision Concept

The report also says the new Vanquish could use Aston's own seven-speed manual featuring a dog-leg first gear, also found in the Vantage AMR. The supercar is said to get a hybrid-assisted, 3.0-liter, twin-turbo V-6, the same basic engine that'll apparently be shared with the Valhalla hypercar

Palmer also reportedly confirmed that the Vanquish will be built around an aluminum monocoque rather than one made of carbon fiber, like its British rival McLaren uses. An aluminum cage apparently makes for a more livable supercar thanks to lower, thinner door sills. 

"Our mainstream cars, have been created to be useable daily—that's why they employ an aluminum tub for a lower and narrower sill—it makes them easier to get in and out of," Palmer explained.