Ferrari 612 Scaglietti Vandenbrink: The Italian Shooting Brake You Might Be Able to Afford

With prices of the 612 Scaglietti hitting rock-bottom around the country, this may substitute the Ferrari FF you can't afford.

ANSHO NL—ANSHO NL

Dutch coachbuilding company Vandenbrink Design has finally announced that its shooting brake conversion for Ferrari's 612 Scaglietti grand tourer is ready for production—and about a decade too late.

Vandenbrink initially revealed its 612-based shooting brake concept way back in 2008, two years before the 612's discontinuation. But now, it's 2019, and the 612's successor—the FF, a shooting brake—has come, gone, and been replaced by another Ferrari shooting brake, the delightful GTC4Lusso. Regardless of how we feel about it, it's worth mentioning that with plummeting prices of 612 Scagliettis around the country, this could be the one Ferrari shooting brake more folks can actually afford.

Vandenbrink Design

Vandenbrink has done an admirable job of shedding the original 612's looks with its shooting brake conversion, which brings both form and function up to speed. Inside its new rear hatch is a leathery cargo area, one that looks cozy enough put a newborn baby down to sleep. It sits beneath a roof with a pair of creative windows that allow the entrance of natural light into the back seats, which are probably much more comfortable than those in the original 612, which sat underneath a sloping coupe roofline.

In theory, the Vandenbrink 612 ought to be about as fast as the grand tourer on which it's based; as it still has that 5.7-liter Ferrari V-12 and all of its 533 horsepower and 434 pound-feet of torque. Sadly Vandenbrink hasn't revealed how much it'd cost to convert a 612 to its specification.

Considering you can pick up a 612 with decent mileage for around $50,000 or $60,000 nowadays, spending an extra $40,000 on the conversion would net you a V-12-powered Italian shooting brake for around $100,000. What else could you want?

Vandenbrink Design