Some BMW iX, i4 Owners Ordered To Stop Driving Due to Battery Fire Risk

BMW says it’ll replace batteries in 83 affected cars after it discovered a short circuit that could potentially start a fire.

byNico DeMattiaAug 1, 2022 12:09 PM
Some BMW iX, i4 Owners Ordered To Stop Driving Due to Battery Fire Risk
BMW iX M60 AVENTURINE RED.
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BMW is telling 83 of its newest EV customers to park their cars away from their homes and leave them there due to an increased fire risk. Eighty-three new 2022-2023 BMW iXs and i4s are being recalled for defective battery cells that could potentially short circuit.

A BMW spokesperson told The Drive the automaker has already notified affected owners.

“Our Customer Relations team has already proactively reached out to all of the owners of affected vehicles to provide information and assistance,” a spokesperson said.

BMW was made aware of an incident in the U.S. with a BMW i4 eDrive40 in April, which prompted an investigation into the battery supplier, Samsung SDI. That investigation led to irregularities in the production of some battery cells, which could allow pieces of cathode to enter the cell, potentially causing it to short circuit. 

Fast forward to June 3, a similar incident occurred in the U.S. but this time with a BMW iX xDrive50. Shortly after that, another incident occurred overseas June 19, with an iX M60. After both iX incidents, similar investigations led to similar findings, which prompted the recall. 

BMW will replace the battery cells in affected models—56 iXs and 27 i4s. BMW is notifying customers by phone and mail to alert them of the issue and to advise them not to drive their cars. Of the 83 vehicles potentially involved, 100% of them are affected. So if a customer gets a call from BMW, notifying them of this recall, it isn’t a potential issue, it’s a real one. 

Not only are customers not allowed to drive their cars but they’re not supposed to charge them. BMW also warns of parking their cars near any structures. If the battery short circuits, it could lead to a potential fire and you don’t want that happening in your garage or near your home. 

Five of the affected models are still on dealer lots. Those dealers have already been notified to fix the cars before they're sold.

Thankfully, there aren’t any reports of any injuries due to the issue.

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