Reviews | The Drive

Best RV Tires: Improve Your Rig’s Ride and Safety

Keep your camper safe on the road with these rugged and dependable RV tires.

With decades of combined experience covering the latest news, reviewing the greatest gear, and advising you on your next car purchase, The Drive is the leading authority on all things automotive.

youtubefacebookinstagram

The Drive and its partners may earn a commission if you purchase a product through one of our links. Read more.

BYLisa Conant/ LAST UPDATED ON June 21, 2022

If it’s been a while since you used your RV and you’re pulling it out of seasonal storage, one of the key items on your safety checklist should be the tires. We’ve all seen some poor sucker pulled off on the shoulder delaying their camping bliss due to an unfortunate flat tire. What’s worse is how hard it is to control your RV when there is a blowout. It can be very dangerous for you and passing motorists to lose a tire on a large rig at highway speeds. Minimize your risk of experiencing a flat tire by replacing them with one of these top picks.

Best Overall

Transeagle ST Radial II Premium Trailer Radial Tires

Summary
These are an all-season, highway terrain tire option that feature a maximum load capacity of 3,527 pounds, making them a rugged and solid choice for many campers.
Pros
  • Relatively affordable
  • Reinforced steel belt construction
  • Ribbed tread design for better handling
Cons
  • Questionable customer service
Best Value

Free Country Trailer Tires

Summary
These are an affordable but durable option that is suitable for travel trailers and fifth wheels and feature the high-quality, 10-ply, steel-belt construction that you find in the big name brands.
Pros
  • Affordable set of four tires
  • Scuff guard system helps prevent rot
  • High maximum speed rating
Cons
Delivery time may be longer than desired
Honorable Mention

Westlake Traction Radial Tire

Summary
This is a great all-around, all-season performance option that’s made in the U.S. and is a decently priced option that features a Q speed rating.
Pros
  • Deep tire tread
  • Stiff sidewalls hold up well against punctures and abrasions
  • Budget-friendly option
Cons
  • Not suitable for class A RVs
  • Not the most stable, smooth ride
Best RV Tires: Improve Your Rig’s Ride and Safety

Our Methodology

When it comes to choosing the best RV tires, I wanted to provide you with a well-rounded list that features a good variety of reputable manufacturers with solid track records of providing high-quality, reliable products. I included a wide range of price points to suit any budget. I focused on RV tires that use the latest technology and that have innovative features and designs suitable for a wide variety of vehicles. For more information on the selection criteria, click this link to The Drive’s Gear About page, which explains our methodology further.

Why Trust Us

Our reviews are driven by a combination of hands-on testing, expert input, “wisdom of the crowd” assessments from actual buyers, and our own expertise. We always aim to offer genuine, accurate guides to help you find the best picks.

Learn more

Best RV Tire Reviews & Recommendations

Best for Class A: Goodyear RV Radial Tire

Specs

  • Brand: Transeagle
  • Model: ST Radiall II
  • Weight Capacity: 3,527 pounds

Pros

  • Relatively affordable
  • Solid 10-ply, reinforced steel belt construction
  • Ribbed tread design allows for better handling

Cons

  • Questionable customer service

If you want a great all-around, reliable, durable, and well-priced tire for your fifth wheel or RV trailer, my top pick to click has to be the Transeagle ST Radial II Premium Trailer Radial Tires. These are an all-season, highway terrain tire option that feature a maximum load capacity of 3,527 pounds, making them a rugged and solid choice for many campers. Designed with reinforced steel belts and 10-ply construction, these tires ensure a safer and more confident towing experience than many others on the market. The deep tread gives you confident traction on wet roads and it extends the tire’s lifespan. The ribbed tread design provides constant road contact and improves steering responsiveness and driving stability. They MIGHT be somewhat less sturdy and long-lasting than some more expensive options.

Specs

  • Brand: Grand Ride
  • Model: Free County
  • Weight Capacity: 2,833 pounds

Pros

  • Affordable set of four tires
  • Scuff guard system helps prevent rot
  • High maximum speed rating

Cons

  • Delivery time may be longer than desired

For those who are looking for the best bang for your buck, I like Free Country Trailer Tires from Grand Ride. It’s an affordable but durable option that’s suitable for travel trailers and fifth wheels. These tires feature the high-quality, 10-ply, steel belt construction that you find in the big name brands, but for a fraction of the cost. Not only will these tires provide stability and support for heavier loads, they offer great overall ride comfort. These tires also feature an innovative, well-made scuff guard system that helps protect against sidewall cracking and dry rot. The M speed rating means that this tire is capable of traveling up to 81 mph safely. A full nylon cap ply adds structural stability and prevents tread separation.

Specs

  • Brand: Westlake
  • Model: SL309
  • Weight Capacity: 1,200 pounds

Pros

  • Deep tire treads prevent hydroplaning
  • Stiffer sidewalls hold up well against punctures and abrasions
  • Budget-friendly option

Cons

  • Not suitable for class A RVs
  • Not the most stable, smooth ride on the market

The Westlake Traction Radial Tire is a great all-around, all-season performance option that’s made in the U.S. This decently priced option features a Q speed rating, which gives you a maximum speed of up to 99 mph. Like many others, this tire features a 10-ply, steel belt construction that’s equipped with a handy treadwear indicator that eliminates the need for guesswork when it comes time for the need for replacement. With a maximum load rating of 1,200 pounds, this tire is appropriate for use on lighter campers and travel trailers. This tire provides a smooth and quiet ride as well as excellent traction in wet, dry, and winter conditions. It’s equipped with a shoulder pattern that provides confident grip and efficient expulsion of water that helps prevent hydroplaning. The main drawback to this tire is that it’s really more suited for light-duty work and isn’t a viable choice for Class A RVs.

Specs

  • Brand: Goodyear
  • Model: G670 RV ULT
  • Weight Capacity: 4,540 pounds

Pros

  • Rugged, sturdy tire meant for heavy-duty applications
  • Tread pattern shunts water and reduces heat buildup
  • Fuel-efficient casing

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Hard to mount

The Goodyear RV Radial Tire is a premium-quality, super rugged tire that’s ideal for larger applications such as Class A RVs. This tire offers a high-tech belt system that offers superior ride comfort and stability that you want on a bigger rig. Special anti-oxidant and anti-ozidant compounds that protect against excessive weather cracking and dry rot. Thanks to the steel-corded sidewalls, this tire offers enhanced toughness and durability that many other makes and models can’t provide. The distinctive tread pattern dissipates heat buildup, ensures confident road grip, and reduces squirm and lateral motion at higher speeds. A special fuel-efficient casing helps you get the most out of your RV’s fuel economy, which is a big concern with today’s fuel prices. This tire is pricey, however, especially if you have a rig that has more than four tires.

Specs

  • Brand: Cooper
  • Model: Wayfarer
  • Weight Capacity: 2,679 pounds

Pros

  • Wide range of suitable applications
  • Limits road noise and sway while driving at higher speeds
  • Distinctive tread pattern provides longevity and even wear

Cons

  • Can be difficult to mount
  • Some quality control issues

The recently launched Cooper Wayfarer All-Season Tire is a great midrange price point that’s ideal for your Class B and C RV. With a decent 50,000-mile warranty, this tire should last you for quite a while, depending on how much traveling you do each season. This versatile tire is also a great choice for trucks and SUVs, making it a fan favorite on the market. The distinctive tread pattern gives you great longevity, durability, and road handling in wet, snowy or hot conditions. R-tech sidewall construction allows for a smooth ride with minimal side-to-side sway. It also helps to minimize blowouts due to abrasions and excess cracking from weather exposure. The construction of this radial tire gives you a happy medium between performance and reliability with minimal ride noise. Other than being somewhat of a nuisance to mount on your RV, there’s not much to dislike about this tire.

Specs

  • Brand: Trailer King
  • Model: ST Radial
  • Weight Capacity: 2,833 pounds

Pros

  • Center groove improves stability and road traction
  • Special nylon overlay construction adds strength and durability
  • Backed by a nationwide limited warranty

Cons

  • Tire tends to wear out quickly under heavy loads
  • Sidewall construction is weak

For your fifth wheel or travel trailer, the Trailer King ST Radial Trailer Tire is a tough choice to beat in terms of performance, reliability, and cost. This tire features a deep center groove in its tread pattern designed to give you stability and excellent tracking. It features an enhanced shoulder design that is great for dissipating heat and allowing for even wear and longer tread life. A nylon overlay construction provides even more strength and durability for heavier load applications. This tire comes backed by a limited warranty. Optimized tread depth and an innovative tread pattern shunt water efficiently and keep you adhered to the road in wet or snowy conditions. This is a great all-season choice. This tire does tend to wear out quicker as you approach its maximum load capacity.

Our Verdict

If you want a great all-season, rugged, well-performing RV tire offered for a price that won’t make you want to cry, my top pick has got to be the Transeagle ST Radial II Premium Trailer Radial Tires. For the budget-conscious consumer, check out the Free Country Trailer Tires.

Things to Consider Before Buying RV Tires

When it comes to RV tires, there are a lot of confusing options and much to consider. It’s definitely not a one-size-fits-all choice. Getting the wrong tires for your RV can not only lead to poor performance, but it can also be dangerous, putting yourself and other motorists at risk. Today’s RV tires come in a wide variety of styles, construction, and size options suitable for different vehicles. Be sure to get the one that most suits your specific needs.

Size

When it comes to the ideal RV tire to suit your needs, size matters, folks. While it may seem overwhelming when you look at all the options out there, it’s really quite simple to determine what you need. Each tire features a combination of letters and numbers on its sidewall. All you need to do is look on your existing tire or in your owner’s manual to get the exact specs. 

Load Rating and Maximum Weight

Another important factor in selecting the proper RV tire is getting the proper load rating or maximum weight capacity. Keep in mind that this doesn’t just pertain to the RV itself but also to your RV once it’s loaded with all your gear and accessories. Ideally, you would select an RV tire that exceeds the recommended maximum load rating in your owner’s manual. 

Class and Type 

Knowing your RV class and type is also essential when selecting the proper RV tire. To clarify, RVs are typically classed as A, B, or C, based on their size and weight. Intuitively, Class A RVs are the larger, more opulent condos on wheels. Confusingly, Class C RVs are the typical fifth wheels, larger travel trailers, and mid-sized driveable RVs, while Class B RVs are the smaller camper-van style that is the most compact. Be sure to get a tire that is specifically rated to be able to be used with your specific class of RV.  

Pricing 

If you’re looking for a decent, reliable, and well-performing tire for an RV, expect to spend anywhere from $100 to $175 per tire, without a rim included. If you want a high-performance, top-of-the-line RV tire that utilizes the most advanced technology and construction materials, you can expect to spend between $190 and $500 per tire. 

FAQs 

You’ve got questions. The Drive has answers.

Q: How often should I rotate my RV’s tires?

A: Typically, you should rotate your RV’s tires every six months or every 6,000 to 8,000 miles, whichever comes first. This helps to ensure even wear and tear on the tires and prevent unstable or shaky riding.

Q: How many years will an RV tire last?

A: This depends greatly on the make, model, and construction of the tire and how often and how far you drive it. Radial tires are generally constructed with steel belts and are thicker than typical car tires. On average, you can expect your RV tires to last anywhere from three to six years.

Q: How can I tell if the tread is wearing down?

A: Many newer tires have a treadwear indicator on them that tells you exactly when your tires should be replaced. Take a penny and lay it upside down on the tire tread with Abraham Lincoln facing you. If you can see his entire face, your tread depth is likely getting too low.

Q: Is D or R better for RV tires?

A: When it comes to RV tires, D indicates a bias-ply tire and R indicates that it’s a radial tire. Radial tires are generally preferred, as they are more resistant to punctures, provide a smoother, quieter ride and offer better fuel economy. Bias-ply tires are more affordable and can carry heavier loads but are less responsive and more susceptible to abrasion and wear.

Q: What pressure should my RV tires be?

A: The recommended RV tire pressure can be anywhere between 34 and 80 psi, depending on your RV’s make and model, its maximum load capacity, and the number of tires on your rig. The recommended tire pressure can usually be found on a sticker somewhere on your RV, in the owner’s manual, or on your original tires.

Q: How do I recycle or dispose of my old RV tires?

A: Getting rid of old RV tires can be a bit of a pain. Many local communities have tire recycling facilities. Call your local recycling center or your city’s EPA to see where the nearest venue is. Some local tire shops also accept old RV tires. As an additional option, you can upcycle your old tires by making fun planters from them or making your own tire swing.

stripe
stripe