Why Buy a Range Rover When You Can Make Your Jeep Wrangler This Fancy?

The Brits know their craft.

Sterling Automotive

The Jeep Wrangler is something so American that it’s hard to imagine it being nearly as popular anywhere else in the world. The off-roader's European sales numbers support that sentiment, with only a fraction being sold across the Atlantic compared to the U.S. of A. Britain-based custom shop Sterling Automotive doesn’t seem to care about any of that, because its $60K-plus custom Wrangler takes the rugged 4x4 in a luxurious and much more expensive direction. Think less bare-bones utility and more glamorous amenities, like bespoke old Land Rovers that have been warmed-over with a craftsman's touch.

Sterling begins with a diesel-powered, two-door JL Wrangler Overland. The engine is a 2.2-liter unit that's different than the 3.0-liter EcoDiesel we see here; instead, it's a four-cylinder shared with various Fiat Chrysler products abroad. Sterling says its luxed-up Wrangler has a top speed of 118 miles per hour and makes the drive from 0 to 60 mph in eight seconds. These figures don't matter in the grand scheme of things, honestly, because this is about luxury.

The interior has been coated in 3D-paneled and perforated leather that covers the seats—which are heated and cooled—as well as the gear shift, dash, doors, and armrests. Alcantara can be found elsewhere, ensuring every surface you touch is up to snuff.

Elsewhere, Sterling widened the wheel arches and added 17-inch Pro Comp wheels with Davanti Terratoura all-terrain tires. Mind you, this is still a Wrangler with four-wheel-drive, even if it's more fit for an around-town runabout than a hardcore trail ride.

The price is certainly large for a two-door Wrangler to us Americans, but the fact is, these rigs are just more expensive in Europe. In all, the upgrades performed by Sterling come at about a $6,000 premium, which is less than what many Jeep owners spend upgrading their rides anyway. If you'd rather a posh and refined Wrangler with the trademark styling, then this might be the best route.

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h/t: Gear Patrol