Best Snow Blowers: Quickly Clear the Path

Get rid of snow without breaking your back with these sturdy and powerful snow blowers

Best Overall

Snow Joe SJ623E Electric Single Stage Snow Thrower

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Best Value

Briggs u0026amp; Stratton Single Stage Snow Blower

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Honorable Mention

Husqvarna Two-Stage Electric Start Snow Blower

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I live in a winter wonderland for a few months out of the year, but when three feet of snow fall on a night, my back starts aching. A snow blower, however, has now saved it and can save your own spine, as well as time and get you back to enjoying all the joys that snow offers. But which snow blower is the best? Which will work when the mercury drops and foot upon foot of snow hits your driveway? Well, look no further as I’ve put together the best snow blowers on the market, including the best which is, *gasp, electric. Check it out below.

Summary List

Our Methodology

I’ve personally tested a number of these snow blowers over the course of my life, while others I put my trust in due to the brand’s equity. I also own the top pick, so you can absolutely trust how we’ve come about the group within this list. You can read more about The Drive’s editorial gear guidelines here.

Best Snow Blower Reviews & Recommendations

Best Overall

Snow Joe SJ623E Electric Single Stage Snow Thrower

See It

Best Value

Briggs u0026 Stratton Single Stage Snow Blower

See It

Honorable Mention

Husqvarna Two-Stage Electric Start Snow Blower

See It

Best Overall

Poulan Pro PR241, 24 in. 208cc LCT Two-Stage Electric Start Snow Blower

See It

Honorable Mention

WEN 5662 Blaster 13.5-Amp 18-Inch Electric Snow Thrower

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Honorable Mention

Greenworks 20-Inch 13 Amp Corded Snow Thrower

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Honorable Mention

Snow Joe iON15SB-LT iONMAX Cordless Single Stage Snow Blower Kit

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Our Verdict

You may be surprised at us picking an electric snow blower like the one from Snow Joe, but I own this one and after using multiple ones in the past, this is by and far the best. It’s easy, quiet, and does an admirable job clearing the mounds of snow that come down on my mountain compound.

Types of Snow Blowers

Electric

If you only have a small area to clear, then an electric snow blower will work just fine. They tend to fail on larger properties because you need to have a cord long enough to keep them plugged in during use. They also work well for light to medium snowfalls on smooth or paved surfaces. 

What’s nice about these snow blowers is that they require minimal maintenance. They also are lighter, easier to move, and quieter than gas models. Since they don’t require oil changes or fuel, they are cheaper to operate. If you have a small patio or short sidewalk that needs clearing, this type is ideal. 

Gas

These snow blowers require gasoline to run. You’ll find them in single-, two-, and three-stage models. They also come in a wide variety of widths. They tend to be heavier than comparable electric models because they have all of the typical gas-powered engine components. This means they also require a lot more maintenance to keep all of those parts in running order. 

You may find the larger gas-powered models to be hard to maneuver due to their weight and bulk. They also tend to be noticeably louder than the other two types. However, they also provide the greatest amount of power to clear compacted or deep snow. 

Battery or Cordless 

These snow blowers operate with the use of a high-voltage battery to provide power. They come in a variety of widths and stages. This makes them ideal for use on light, moderate, and heavy snow. You’ll find them to be heavier than the corded but lighter than the gas-powered blowers. 

These models tend to cost less than the other types of snow blowers, so they’re good for someone who’s on a tight budget. They also come with the added benefit of never worrying about running over the cord and don’t require the maintenance that you’d have to do with a gas-powered model. 

Key Features

Stages 

Blowers come in one, two, and three stages. All three types use an auger that rotates to pull the snow off of the ground. Then the snow gets expelled out of the chute. A single-stage blower has a corkscrew device as the only moving part. A two-stage blower has the turning corkscrew and an impeller to help break up the snow and force it out of the chute faster and further. A three-stage blower adds an accelerator to the process to make these blowers the most efficient. 

Power Source 

There are three types of power sources to choose from. There are gas, electric, and battery-powered snow blowers. The majority of models are gas-powered. These machines are loud, require regular maintenance, and need fuel. But they’re the most powerful and effective at clearing snow. 

Corded machines can be hooked up to an extension cord and can give you a usable range of about 100 feet. They won’t perform as well as gas machines, and you’ll have a cord to contend with. 

Battery-powered blowers are a relatively new technology. They work best on light snow and require you to plug them in to charge the battery when not in use. 

Wheels vs. Tracks 

The vast majority of snow blowers use wheels to make them mobile. For smaller machines, you’ll need to push and pull them to get them to move. Larger machines send power to the wheels for easier maneuvering. 

Some larger units have tracks similar to what you see on tanks. This design is best if you have to clear steep driveways or hills. Wheels will want to roll and make the blower hard to use. Tracks are more stable and have better traction. 

Snow Blowers Pricing

Snow blower pricing ranges from under $100 for a snow sweeper to over $1,000 for a two-stage gas thrower with 2-wheel drive. But you can get a decent snow blower for under $300 that’ll last you quite some time.

FAQs

You’ve got questions. The Drive has answers.

Q: What if I bend or break a blade?

A: Just like a lawnmower, you may end up bending a blade or auger on the snowblower. This can happen after hitting a rock or grinding against the ground. If you do end up with a broken blade, stop using the snowblower before you risk harming it further. You can buy snowblower blades at home department stores or online.

Q: How much snow can a snowblower handle?

A: This will depend on the snowblower you purchase. Gas-powered ones are capable of clearing a path up to 24 inches wide, maybe even wider. They also can clear a path that is up to 16 inches deep. 

Q: How should I store the snowblower?

A: The best way to store a snowblower is in the garage or someplace that will not get dangerously cold. You can leave them outside and cover them with a warm tarp or blanket if needed, but you increase the risk of it freezing up on you.

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Jonathon Klein Avatar

Jonathon Klein

Managing Editor, Commerce

Jonathon is the Managing Editor for Commerce at The Drive and has been writing about cars and motorcycles for over a decade, but he's been known to scribble pretty things about the foster care system, adoption, tattoos, sex and life, gear, adventures, food, autonomy, technology, and numerous other topics. He’s been working for The Drive since 2019 when he started as its Senior Editor.