Reviews | The Drive

Best Tires For Your Honda Accord: Stay Connected to the Road

Here’s some rubber to bring out the best in America’s favorite blue-collar sedan.

With decades of combined experience covering the latest news, reviewing the greatest gear, and advising you on your next car purchase, The Drive is the leading authority on all things automotive.

youtubefacebookinstagram

The Drive and its partners may earn a commission if you purchase a product through one of our links. Read more.

BYJeric Jaleco/ LAST UPDATED ON May 20, 2022

For decades, the Honda Accord has been a perennial favorite of those who want reliability and affordability, and so it deserves the best tires to complement its gleaming reputation. Roomy, practical, and reliable, Honda’s midsize masterpiece has won the hearts of drivers and journalists from all over. In recent years, it has even edged itself closer to obtaining faux luxury stardom and fun-to-drive enthusiast credibility. Such a versatile machine deserves the right set of tires to get the best out of it, but how do you know what the right pick is for your application?


Let The Drive help with our comprehensive buyers guide for scoring the perfect rubber to match your Honda Accord. We’ve got you covered with tires of all sorts, from the backroad cruises to the Costco Grand Prix. Scroll on through, and happy shopping!

Best Overall

Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4

Summary
The best tire for the best Accords, the Pilot Sport All Season 4 elevates your family sport sedan with stellar all-weather traction and sports-car-like handling.
Pros
  • Excellent dry traction
  • Transcendent wet traction
  • Responses worthy of sports cars
  • Surprising performance in light snow
Cons
  • Not a true winter tire
  • Somewhat firm ride
Best Value

Sumitomo HTR A/S P03

Summary
Bring year-round usability and sporty dynamics to your Accord for a bargain. This choice from Sumitomo picks a fight with some top-dollar brands.
Pros
  • Hard-to-beat price tag
  • Reasonably athletic responses
  • Handy in the wet
  • Class leader in light snow
Cons
  • Premium performance all-seasons leave it for dead
  • Ho-hum steering feel
  • Mild road noise
Honorable Mention

Continental PureContact LS

Summary
A balanced and mildly athletic choice from another heavy-hitter brand, the PureContact LS is undeniably a fantastic touring all-season.
Pros
  • Perhaps the most well-mannered on this list
  • Fantastic wet traction
  • Some light snow capability
Cons
  • Just a tad firm for its class
  • Mild road noise
Best Tires For Your Honda Accord: Stay Connected to the Road

Our Methodology

It’s the mission of everyone at The Drive, myself included, to produce the most informative yet honest takes for every buyer’s guide we curate. We combat the difficulties of sourcing a dozen tires to test with our vault of personal knowledge fortified with extensive research on expert opinions, consumer reviews, and objective test data. Thankfully, online retail giant Tire Rack has once again proven to be an irreplaceable resource for all this information under one roof.

My picks were simply the most balanced, well-rounded tires in their class unless a category called for a focused task, and those with a strong consumer backing were heavily preferred. After all, while fancy tech and big test numbers tell one side of the story, the most important tale to tell is how they perform in the real world in the hands of real people. For more information on how we usually curate our guides, check out the link here.

Why Trust Us

Our reviews are driven by a combination of hands-on testing, expert input, “wisdom of the crowd” assessments from actual buyers, and our own expertise. We always aim to offer genuine, accurate guides to help you find the best picks.

Learn more

Best Honda Accord Tire Reviews & Recommendations

Specs

  • Manufacturer: Michelin
  • Tire Type: Performance all-season
  • Speed Rating: ZR

Pros

  • Excellent dry traction
  • Transcendent wet traction
  • Responses worthy of sports cars
  • Surprising light-snow usability

Cons

  • Not a true winter tire
  • Somewhat firm ride

Among the most acclaimed and popular tires on this list, the Pilot Sport All Season 4 is seemingly infallible in its pursuit of year-round fun. These have become the go-to do-it-all tire that I’ve seen on anything and everything from classic 911s to Honda Civics, and for good reason. Not unlike a summer performance tire, the strong shoulders result in rapid responses and sharp steering feel. The labyrinthian tread, interlocking 360-degree siping, and “extreme silica” compound develop tenacious wet traction that made the Michelin a balanced and high-ranking performer in Tire Rack’s hands. It’s even quite good in light snow, with some consumers dubbing them as their choice for mild winters.

Still, it will never replace a true winter tire so beware of deeper snow and slush. The stiffer construction versus other all-seasons that gives it such athleticism results in a ride that’s firm but not harsh. Tire Rack staff have noted some mild road noise, but most larger sedan drivers have found it to be mostly unobtrusive. These are merely minor flaws on an otherwise fantastic tire.

Specs

  • Manufacturer: Sumitomo
  • Tire Type: Performance all-season
  • Speed Rating: R

Pros

  • Hard-to-beat price tag
  • Reasonably athletic responses
  • Handy in the wet
  • Class leader in light snow

Cons

  • Premium performance all-seasons leave it for dead
  • Ho-hum steering feel
  • Mild road noise

Among the most acclaimed and popular tires on this list, the Pilot Sport All Season 4 is seemingly infallible in its pursuit of year-round fun. These have become the go-to do-it-all tire that I’ve seen on anything and everything from classic 911s to Honda Civics, and for good reason. Not unlike a summer performance tire, the strong shoulders result in rapid responses and sharp steering feel. The labyrinthian tread, interlocking 360-degree siping, and “extreme silica” compound develop tenacious wet traction that made the Michelin a balanced and high-ranking performer in Tire Rack’s hands. It’s even quite good in light snow, with some consumers dubbing them as their choice for mild winters.

Still, it will never replace a true winter tire so beware of deeper snow and slush. The stiffer construction versus other all-seasons that gives it such athleticism results in a ride that’s firm but not harsh. Tire Rack staff have noted some mild road noise, but most larger sedan drivers have found it to be mostly unobtrusive. These are merely minor flaws on an otherwise fantastic tire.

Specs

  • Manufacturer: Continental
  • Tire Type: Grand touring all-season
  • Speed Rating: R

Pros

  • Perhaps the most well-mannered on this list
  • Fantastic wet traction
  • Some light snow capability

Cons

  • Just a tad firm for its class
  • Mild road noise

The Continental PureContact LS is the sensible choice for the sensible Accord driver. Occupying space with the best all-seasons around, the Conti stands out as one of the most well-rounded and better-balanced tires on sale. It’s pleasantly sporty without any wannabe-racer pretensions, and it’s comfortable without being lazy. Tire Rack was especially enamored with its strong wet weather performance and light-snow traction that barely trails the class-leading Vredestein Quatrac Pro. Dry weather highlighted this tire’s at-the-limit handling with the fastest lap times for lead-footed Accord owners who aren’t ready for a true performance tire.

Complaints were merely nitpicks that were few and far between. While totally acceptable, road noise and ride quality were just a smidge behind where drivers would’ve liked for a tire of this caliber, and despite holding its own in light snow testing, it’s still no replacement for a true winter tire. A few owners have reported tread life that was shorter than desired but still plenty usable.

Specs

  • Manufacturer: Vredestein
  • Tire Type: Performance winter
  • Speed Rating: R

Pros

  • Lovably sporty
  • Good steering feel for its class
  • Reduced road noise over its peers
  • King of the winter wastelands

Cons

  • Typical winter tire limitations during summer
  • Could use more ice grip

A journalist’s delight and an instant hit in the American market, the Vredestein Wintrac Pro amps up the pluses of a winter tire while dialing back some drawbacks to create a fun, capable product. This option had been renowned for its tenacious grip in snow and frigid asphalt while exhibiting relatively unobtrusive noise and a degree of steering feel, an unusual trait in something as soft as a winter tire. Tire Rack testers and consumers alike were also impressed with its plush ride quality.

Ice traction, however, while still totally usable and becoming of a winter tire, trailed its peers. Additionally, while many consumers enjoy its versatility, it will still suffer the same winter tire woes when the temps start to climb. Expect accelerated tire wear and sluggish responses as the venerable Vredesteins start to learn that summer has come.

Best Summer Performance Tire
Michelin Pilot Sport 4S
Check Latest Price

Specs

  • Manufacturer: Michelin
  • Tire Type: Max high-performance summer
  • Speed Rating: ZR

Pros

  • Fierce dry traction
  • Razor-sharp responses
  • Sacrifices next to nothing on wet roads
  • Well-mannered for its aggressiveness

Cons

  • Typical summer tire limitations in the winter
  • Nosebleed price

Michelin’s Pilot Sport 4S is for the high octane-blooded Accord drivers on the quest to send their manual V6 coupe or two-liter turbo sport to the glistening gates of Valhalla. Or, you know, it’s just an exceptionally nice tire for discerning shoppers, one that this writer has had plenty of experience with. High levels of grip and road refinement are the defining traits of this entry. Performance is a picture-perfect match for supercars, while noise and comfort are adequate enough for luxo barges. Michelin’s hybrid rubber compound and ingenious use of tread patterns ensure excellent wet performance that’s nearly unflappable even at highway speeds.

But all this acclaim comes at a price – literally. These are easily the most expensive tires on the market for any car. On top of that, you’re still kneecapped by the usual caveats of a summer tire during winter months, including the greatly increased risk of hardening and the traction of ice skates. Snowbelt residents would be wise to search for another tire or keep some Wintrac Pros on hand.

Specs

  • Manufacturer: Michelin
  • Tire Type: Grand touring all-season
  • Speed Rating: R

Pros

  • Surprisingly sporty
  • Invincible in the wet
  • Darn good impression of a winter tire

Cons

  • Mild road noise
  • Directional tread inhibits ability to properly rotate
  • Somewhat reduced fuel economy

The Michelin CrossClimate2 has been hailed by journalists as one of the best, if not the best, all-seasons on sale today. The original was so successful that it spawned a sequel and an SUV-specific spin-off. This option aims to deliver solid, surefooted performance that’s truly capable of year-round traction even in harsh winters. The V-shaped tread evacuates moisture rapidly and is assisted by Michelin’s 3D SipeLock technology which also reinforces the tread block for stable handling. Bundled with Michelin’s ThermalActive rubber compound, wet and snow traction is among the strongest of any tire and enough to earn it the 3PMSF logo. Tire Rack testers were deeply impressed by the refinement and low noise for such an aggressive tire, as well as an appreciable athleticism in the way it steers.

While noise is low, however, a few owners have reported some mild yet unobtrusive tone which is still far lower than expected for this faux winter tire. The directional tread may inhibit your ability to rotate tires properly, and the soft-ish compound, which works wonders with traction, has resulted in noticeable dips in some owners’ fuel economy.

Our Verdict on Honda Accord Tires

The Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 earns top marks for being the sporty year-round superstar to perfectly match a sporty, year-round family sedan. Sumitomo’s HTR A/S P03 steals another Best Value spot for continuing to deliver admirable performance in a variety of weather conditions on the cheap. And Continental’s PureContact LS stands as one of the best commuter tires for someone looking to treat their Accord on their own accord (not sorry). 

But let us know if you know of any other tires that would be a stellar match for one of America’s most cherished family haulers. We’re always keen to expand our knowledge with you.

What to Consider When Buying Honda Accord Tires

There are a million different tires for a million different Accord drivers, each with their own grocery list of needs. Before you impulse buy the highest-rated tire you see, ask yourself what you need and take a look at what tires are out here. Do you want some athleticism for the occasional cruise or the versatility to challenge your winter woes? It helps to know the differences, so here are some ways in which a tire can distinguish itself.

Types of Tires

All-Season/Touring

Versatile and plentiful, these are your go-to's for most commuting and road trip applications. Being an all-season or touring tire means being a part of an all-encompassing field that includes miserly eco tires, cozy grand touring rubber, and spritely performance all-seasons. What they share are complex tread patterns aimed at providing traction in the wet and rubber compounds formulated to work in a variety of temperatures while maintaining reasonably long tread life. 

It’s important to note that an all-season tire’s mission to be usable year-round results in compromises during the winter. Their compounds, while versatile, may not be as resistant to hardening in extreme cold, and their tread blocks may lack sufficient siping to dig into the snow. Some all-seasons are bred to better tackle light snow and ice to truly be used as four-season rubber and are often designated by a three-peak mountain snowflake (3PMSF) logo.

Winter

If you guessed that these are formulated specifically for snowy and icy conditions in especially cold winters, then you’re a genius of the highest order. But how do they go about being snowbelt heroes? True, dedicated winter tires don hyper-aggressive and complicated tread patterns marked with large channels and plenty of siping for evacuating moisture and providing sharp edges to claw at the snow. Their high-silica rubber compounds will be quite soft to resist freezing over in extreme cold and maintain traction.

There is a big catch despite seeming near-invincible on paper. Their ultra-soft compounds, godsends on ice, are detrimental during warmer months. As they heat up, the tires get especially “squishy,” resulting in sluggish driving dynamics and accelerated wear.

Summer High-Performance

For road warriors and wannabe racers, these tires will elevate a car’s performance to new heights with extreme levels of lateral grip. Fat tread blocks with minimal tread mean more rubber on the road but sometimes at the expense of wet traction. Thankfully, most modern summer tires will make ingenious use of their minimal tread and advanced rubber compounds to compensate and sacrifice little in the wet as a result.

However, summer tires are the most compromised in the winter and should never be exposed to extreme cold or even light snow. Their aggressive rubber compounds are at their best when warm, so they’re the most susceptible to hardening and cracking below freezing. Coupled with a useless tread incapable of grasping onto the tiniest snowflakes, you’re in for some unruly slip-n’-slide shenanigans.

Tire Key Features

Tread Pattern

The arrangement of all those cuts and slashes across your tire is crucial in determining overall traction, all-weather usability, and refinement. Large channels and grooves are intended to evacuate moisture quickly for the tire to maintain contact with the road. Siping — those itty-bitty slashes — assists on a smaller scale and creates a more abrasive surface for snow, while softening up tread blocks for added comfort.

Extremely aggressive tread patterns found on all-terrains, mud tires, or winter tires will often generate far more noticeable noise than less focused tires. Summer tires will sport less tread on their surface to maximize rubber contact in dry weather and often at the expense of compromised wet traction.

Sidewall

Sidewall construction is arguably the most important factor in the feel and comfort of passenger car tires. I could conjure up some drawn-out science lesson, but it mainly boils down to how thick is it and how stiff it is? Stiffer or shorter sidewalls like what’s found in most performance-oriented tires improve steering feel and responsiveness by resisting deflection as the tire is loaded up, but this may result in harsher impacts over bumps. Conversely, softer or fatter sidewalls may dampen steering feel and result in comparatively slower responses as the tire flexes.

Drivers searching for a mix of both would be wise to hunt for reputable, quality rubber with the perfect sidewall — measured in aspect ratio — for their needs. For example, if you’d like a cushier ride, perhaps try a softer touring-oriented tire or step up to a larger sidewall.

Rubber Compound

The simple matter of how hard or soft a tire compound will have a rippling effect throughout a tire’s performance. Alongside sidewall construction, this determines how a tire rides and handles in addition to how it performs during inclement weather. Most performance tires will use some sort of hybrid compound where center tread blocks are left slightly softer for improved comfort and wet traction, while the shoulders are stiffer to maintain responsiveness. Economy tires may be constructed of a stiff compound to reduce rolling resistance and improve fuel economy and tread life.

Silica is an ingredient that’s become incredibly popular across the industry as it blends with the rubber to create a soft-ish compound that remains pliable in cold weather. Most all-seasons and winter tires will utilize high-silica compounds for snow use, while a few touring tires have made use of it to improve ride quality.

Honda Accord Tire Pricing 

Being a larger, midsize sedan versus the compacts we’ve previously featured, tire sets will be marginally more expensive. Expect most all-seasons and touring tires to ring in between $700 and $800 per set, depending on the size. Specialty premium models such as the Pilot Sport All Season 4 and CrossClimate2 will cost around $750 to $1,000 per set. The Pilot Sport 4S summer tire will carry the heaviest toll at nearly $1,300 for 19-inch Accord Sport wheels. Our Best Value-winning Sumitomo is far easier on the wallet at under $600 for a set on lower-trim 17-inch wheels.

FAQs 

You’ve got questions. The Drive has answers.

Q: Can I use all-season tires in the winter?

A: Probably, but generally no. Most all-seasons have difficulties grabbing at snow and ice and tend to harden in extreme cold. If you want to skip winter rubber for a single, year-round tire, seriously consider 3PMSF tires with their enhanced winter capabilities.

Q: How do tires affect fuel economy?

A: Economy-minded tires with low drag have a lower rolling resistance, allowing cars to press forward with less effort. Softer tires such as winter or performance tires will usually generate more drag and have higher rolling resistance, hurting fuel economy in the name of higher traction.

Q: Is it safe to run non-OEM wheel and tire sizes?

A: If you’ve been to a modified car meet lately, then you’ll see that you absolutely can! Just be cautious not to go too far with tire width and wheel diameter to avoid obliterating your inner fenders. Tire Rack has a fun configurator to help buyers decide on the right wheel-and-tire combo.

stripe
stripe