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Be Bold and Buy This 1965 Ford Mustang That’s Really a FWD Honda Underneath

If you've ever wanted classic American looks with '00s Japanese reliability, then by golly, this was made for you.
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It’s safe to say Facebook Marketplace is the new Craigslist. You can find anything on there, for better or worse, including some seriously strange rides. This 1965 Ford Mustang that’s actually an ’05 Honda Accord fits in that category for sure, but the listing makes some points that are hard to deny. Whether or not it’s worth the $15,500 asking price remains to be decided, though.

The seller argues it’s “the most reliable Ford in Missouri,” not to mention “the best looking Honda.” Spoken like a true Bowtie guy, huh? Anyhow, the looks are polarizing, to say the least. The Mustang body is obviously retro, and indeed, it’s titled as a ’65 Ford. But those fender flares are throwing me off, and then there are the halo headlights and the “Honda” script below the doors.

Its Japanese economy car roots are even clearer inside. The door cards and hand-crank windows may be period correct for the Mustang, but the dashboard, steering wheel, seats, and automatic shifter are all Honda. I’m not sure where the vertical infotainment screen comes from but I’m not worried enough by it to ask. This thing doesn’t take itself too seriously so neither will I.

Under the hood is a Honda K24 four-cylinder that apparently made 160 horsepower when new. That’s more than the ’65 Mustang’s 200-cubic-inch Thriftpower inline-six ever made, though it isn’t as much as the 289-cubic-inch V8. And as if it weren’t strange enough seeing Honda badges on a classic ‘Stang, I’m most bothered by the transverse-mounted engine. It’s really throwing me off.

Photos included in the ad show the Accord stripped down to its basic unibody, as well as the original Mustang shell sitting in storage. It seems like someone had both just lying around and decided it was best to marry the two. The result is unique, that much anyone can agree on, and the seller says it’s proven to be a solid daily driver.

I wouldn’t spend $15,500 on it, although I’m sure it took a ton of time to put together. Maybe that will be enough to justify the price for someone. I won’t knock it; instead, I’ll advise you to use your best judgment. If that means you drive home in a new-to-you coupe of mixed origins, then hey, good enough for ya.

Got a tip or question for the author? Contact them directly: caleb@thedrive.com