Using a Power Washer to Paint Your Car Is a Terrible Idea

Surprise, surprise.

Garage54 via YouTube

Bored minds lead to bad ideas and when it comes to painting your car with a power washer, it doesn't get much worse. Still, it's fun to imagine; I wouldn't turn it down if I had a cheap beater laying around. Oh, and if I didn't care what happened to my power washer either. Luckily, the YouTubers at Garage54 were able to try out this goofy test and capture the process on video.

Power washers are known more for destroying paint on old cars—not repairing it. Then again, the end result isn't all that great here as the poor Lada only looks slightly better than before. Even with its new blue hue, it's far from factory-fresh.

They should be applauded for rigging up a system that works, though, as it's pretty clever. By equipping a plastic jug with a metal fitting that connects it to the power washer via a hose, they created their own makeshift tank that worked in a cinch. They also drilled another small hole and fitted a valve stem to feed compressed air into the jug, ensuring the paint would shoot into and out of the machine.

The crew never makes mention of exactly how powerful the pressure washer is, but it's likely pushing somewhere around 3,000 psi. Because of that, this respray was performed in record time with little to no prep work—in fact, it only took around one minute. Normally, you'd want lower pressure for a lighter, more even coat. That just isn't the case here, as you can tell from the paint that's dripping off the fenders.

It was a noble effort regardless, and it's hard to knock 'em for trying. After all, it's not much worse than the hackjobs we see roll into real repair shops every day.

If you decide to try this yourself, maybe consider using a primer. That, and standing far, far away from the car when you pull the trigger. The results won't be perfect, but you might be able to pull something off that's slightly better than a paint roller.

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