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Best Motorcycle Tracking Devices: An Eye on Your Bike at All Times

Get a GPS tracker so you don’t lose hope — or your bike.

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BYRobert Bacon/ LAST UPDATED ON May 23, 2022

Some thieves will go to incredible lengths to steal your pride and joy, but what you have on your side is that they don’t know how far you’ll go to protect it. Motorcycle GPS tracking devices are a rider’s last line of defense against thieves because when you need to use them, your bike is usually already gone. Most of these devices will alert you as soon as someone starts tampering with your bike, unbeknownst to the perpetrator. What’s fantastic about these tracking units is they don’t just help you get your bike back, you’ll often catch the thieves who tried to snatch it, too.

Best Overall

Spy Tec GPS GL300

Summary
Everything you need to keep track of your bike for a low price, plus it comes with a lifetime warranty.
Pros
  • Includes magnetic waterproof case
  • Real-time location tracking via GPS
  • IP65 waterproof rating
  • Lifetime warranty
  • 14-day battery life
Cons
  • Subscription service is pricey
Best Value

Amcrest GPS GL300

Summary
Similar to the best overall pick, but it has a cheaper list price and subscription plan. Unfortunately, the battery isn’t as good.
Pros
  • Good value
  • Real time tracking
  • Waterproof magnetic case included
  • Geo-fencing smart alerts
Cons
  • Some subscription plans are pricey
  • Battery life isn’t great
Honorable Mention

Monimoto M7 GPS Anti-Theft Tracker

Summary
A motorcycle-specific tracker that has an extraordinary battery life and a low-cost subscription plan.
Pros
  • Battery can last more than one year
  • Reusable zip ties included
  • Can fit almost anywhere on your bike
  • Two-year warranty
  • Two free months of Monimoto subscription
Cons
  • High initial price
  • Movement only updated every one minute
Best Motorcycle Tracking Devices: An Eye on Your Bike at All Times

Our Methodology

To choose the best motorcycle GPS tracking devices on the market, I employed The Drive’s comprehensive research methodology and evaluated dozens of GPS trackers before choosing the top contenders. Although I haven’t personally tested these products, my selection is informed by consumer testimonials, expert reviews, discussions on relevant online forums, and my institutional knowledge of the automotive industry. I visited the Motorcycle subreddit to get a more informed opinion of what motorcyclists felt about the products on the market and RevZilla to see what the experts had to say after their hands-on tests.

Why Trust Us

Our reviews are driven by a combination of hands-on testing, expert input, “wisdom of the crowd” assessments from actual buyers, and our own expertise. We always aim to offer genuine, accurate guides to help you find the best picks.

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Best Motorcycle GPS Tracking Device Reviews & Recommendations

Specs

  • Make:Spy Tec
  • Model:GL300
  • Battery Life:14 days

Pros

  • Includes magnetic waterproof case
  • Real-time location tracking via GPS tracking
  • IP65 waterproof rating
  • Lifetime warranty
  • 14-day battery life

Cons

  • Subscription service is pricey

The Spytec GPS GL300 Real-Time Tracker takes my vote as the best overall motorcycle GPS tracker. Let’s start with the fact that this model comes with a weatherproof magnetic case, meaning you can attach it to any metal surface on your bike and not worry about it getting damaged by harsh weather conditions. It tracks your bike using 4G satellite technology and gives you real-time updates via the manufacturer’s iOS/Android apps. Its rechargeable battery lasts up to two weeks and will alert you when it’s getting low. You can hardwire this device to your motorcycle’s battery if you take it out of the weatherproof magnetic case, but you’d need to ensure it’s protected from the elements. The 4G data networks have an unlimited range and constantly log and transmit data to your device. The device has a relatively low price, especially when you consider that it comes with a lifetime warranty. But its subscription plan is a bit pricey, and you can expect to pay anything between $300 and $360 per year, depending on what payment plan you choose. Subscribers get 24/7 support, which could be worth the high subscription price for some people. It’s easy to set up and comes with a SIM card, so you’ll be ready to fit this on your bike within a few minutes of receiving it.

Specs

  • Make:Amcres
  • Model:GL300
  • Battery Life:2 to 14 days (depending on tracking frequency)

Pros

  • Good value
  • Real-time tracking
  • Waterproof magnetic case included
  • Geo-fencing smart alerts

Cons

  • Some subscription plans are pricey
  • Battery life isn’t great

The Amcrest GPS GL300 is reliable and has everything you need to get set up quickly. Included in the sale are an IP65 weatherproof housing that has two magnets on it and a pouch case. The device uses a 4G satellite network, which requires a subscription to track your motorcycle and works in the USA, Canada, and Mexico only. Depending on the subscription plan you choose, you can get real-time tracking updates every 60 seconds, 30 seconds, 15 seconds, or five seconds. You can expect the subscription to cost anywhere from $240 to $420 per year. So while the initial package is great value, the premium subscription plans aren’t. Live updates can be sent to your desktop or the Amcrest GPS smartphone app (iOS/Android). You can set up custom reports and share links with your friends and family using the Amcrest app. This model also features geo-fencing, which alerts you if your bike goes into certain areas, over the speed limit, or brakes harshly. You can receive alerts via text, emails, or push notifications, but phone calls are not an option. The battery lasts 10 to 14 days when sending updates every 60 seconds, but this drops to two to three days when updating every five seconds.

Specs

  • Make:Monimoto
  • Model:M7
  • Battery Life:More than a year

Pros

  • Battery can last more than one year
  • Reusable zip ties included
  • Can fit almost anywhere on your bike
  • Two-year warranty
  • Two free months of Monimoto subscription

Cons

  • High initial price
  • Movement only updated every one minute

The Monimoto M7 GPS Anti-Theft Tracker is the first motorcycle-specific device on this list, and for some riders it’ll be the best option. The initial cost of this kit seems pricey, but when you consider the yearly subscription plan is less than $50, it’ll save you money in the long run when compared to most other models. There’s an embedded eSIM that gives you two months of free GSM service, after which you can pay for your yearly subscription through the Monimoto app. This model works globally with the LTE Cat-M1 (4G) network, and sends GPS location updates every five minutes when the device is in motion or every minute if live tracking mode is enabled. This model automatically arms and disarms depending on how close its paired fob is. If it’s armed and someone tries to move your bike, the device will call your cell phone within one minute. After that, you can follow the tracking updates via an app on your phone. The two long-life batteries that power this tracker can last for more than a year, meaning you can place this under your fairings and not worry about needing to charge it every two weeks. Helping you attach this tracker to out-of-sight areas are reusable zip ties, and since they’re reusable, you can place it on different bikes. It has an IP65 waterproof rating and a two-year manufacturer warranty.

Specs

  • Make:Apple
  • Model:AirTag
  • Battery Life:More than a year

Pros

  • No subscription
  • Fantastic value for money
  • IP67 waterproof rating
  • Lightweight

Cons

  • Doesn't use GPS location system
  • Only compatible with iPhone 11 and newer

If you don’t want to pay the high-subscription prices that are associated with inexpensive tracking devices, the Apple AirTag is for you. The AirTag uses ultra wideband technology to help you keep track of items by sending out a Bluetooth signal that’s detected by nearby iPhones. The phones that detect the signal send the device's location to the iCloud, so you can find it on the Find My app, which is encrypted end to end. The device is inexpensive, and there’s no subscription. The only downside is that this model doesn't use satellite-location technology, which means that if there aren’t any iPhones near the AirTag, you won’t be able to find your bike. So it might not be suitable for people who live in rural areas. The AirTag comes with a battery, which is replaceable, and lasts for over a year. It has an IP67 waterproof rating, so it’ll survive anything the elements throw at it with ease, and weighs just 0.39 ounces. Unfortunately, this device isn’t compatible with Android devices and only works with the iPhone 11 and its successors.

Specs

  • Make:Rlink
  • Model:GPS Tracking System
  • Battery Life:Indefinite (hardwired)

Pros

  • Inexpensive subscription service
  • Three-point harness included
  • Battery and bike diagnostic updates
  • Extremely sensitive

Cons

  • Pricey initial cost

If you never want to worry about recharging your tracker, pick up the Rlink GPS Tracking System. This device provides real-time tracking and location sharing, and is hardwired to your motorcycle’s 12-volt battery. It’s kept in place by a three-point harness that’s included in the sale. The only worry you should have is if you don’t ride your bike regularly enough to keep its battery topped up. Thankfully, this tracker monitors your bike’s battery and diagnostics and keeps you updated via the Rever app, so you can top your battery up before it goes flat. This device is motion sensitive and sends you an alert if your bike is touched, moved, or started depending on what alerts you choose to receive. You must subscribe to the Rever app to receive notifications, but the basic subscription plan is free, and the most premium option is less than $60. It uses the top U.S. mobile carriers to pinpoint your motorcycle, as long as it’s in North America. This is the priciest GPS tracker on this list, but since the subscription service is free if you choose the entry-level plan, it’ll cost you the least amount of money to own in the long run. The only issue I have with this model is that hardwired GPS trackers are easier for thieves to locate.

Our Verdict

You can place the Spy Tec GPS GL300 practically anywhere on your bike thanks to the durable, waterproof, magnetic case that’s included in the sale. It won’t break the bank, and It’ll alert you as soon as anyone tampers with your bike and keep you up to date with its movements in real time. If you’re on a tight budget, check out my value pick, the Amcrest GPS GL300.

Things to Consider Before Buying a Motorcycle GPS Tracking Device 

Tracking System and Subscription Plans

Most trackers work using a 4G SIM card and GPS, which is generally accurate to within 10 to 25 feet. Depending on what SIM card or plan you use, the tracking device will work globally or only in select North American countries. Subscription plans and prices vary widely from free to around $35 per month. Some motorcycle-specific trackers are expensive but end up cheaper in the long run, thanks to low-cost subscription plans.

Some plans will send you positional updates every five minutes, whereas other plans will send you updates every five seconds, and there are plans that accommodate everything in between. So you need to decide how important update frequency is to you. Other tracking devices, like the AirTag, don’t require a subscription, as they don’t work on a GPS satellite network. The problem is that these trackers rely on a network of devices to track your bike, so if it’s in a rural area, you might not be able to find it.

Battery Life and Power Source

Depending on where you place your tracker, its battery life could be a hindrance or a benefit. For example, if you’re going to remove your fairings and zip tie a tracker under them, you’ll need a device with a long battery life, unless you want to remove your fairings every two weeks. If you’ll keep your tracker under your seat, then one with a battery life of three days might not be an issue. 

Look for a tracker that can be hardwired to the bike’s 12-volt battery if you never want to worry about charging it. The disadvantages to a hardwired tracker is that they stop working if your bike's battery is dead, and they're easier for thieves to find. 

Durability

Depending on where you’ll keep your tracking device, its durability and water resistance will be a factor. If the device will be exposed to the elements, then it needs to have at least an IP65 rating, making it weatherproof and water-resistant. But, ideally you’d get a model with an IP67 rating, meaning even if it gets submerged in water, it should be fine.

Some models come with waterproof cases that have magnets, which allows you to stick it to any metal surface on your bike. These are great options if you like to go off-road or regularly ride in harsh conditions. The only issue with these waterproof cases is that they usually prevent you from hardwiring the tracker to your motorcycle’s battery.

Extra Features

Some devices that are hardwired to your bike’s battery can give you live battery and diagnostic updates. You can also get devices that’ll call your cell phone instead of just giving you a push notification if your bike moves. You can adjust the sensitivity of some devices, from letting you know if someone touches your machine to only informing you if the engine is started. Certain trackers will only alert you when your motorcycle goes outside of a boundary zone that you’ve pre-determined, which is useful if you let other people ride your bike.

Compatibility

Usually, compatibility won’t be an issue, but it’s still something you need to check out before buying your tracker. For example, AirTags will only work with iPads and iPhones that are model 11 or newer. So make sure the tracker you choose will work with both your desktop and mobile devices before choosing one. 

Motorcycle GPS Tracker Pricing 

You can pick up a general GPS tracking device that uses the 4G network and will work on a motorcycle for $30, but many of these models have expensive subscription plans and a battery life of fewer than 14 days. For between $30 and $100, you can get a GPS tracker that gives real-time updates and comes with a waterproof case that has magnets, meaning you can attach it to any metal surface on your bike. For $100 to $250, you can pick up a motorcycle-specific tracking device with a battery that’ll last for more than a year or one that can be hardwired to your bike’s battery and send battery level and diagnostic updates to your phone. 

Some of the more expensive GPS tracking units have relatively cheap subscription plans, meaning that you can recoup the high initial cost within a year and continue to save money for as long as you use it. So pay close attention to subscription plan prices when picking out a model. 

FAQs 

You’ve got questions. The Drive has answers.

Q: Where should I put a tracker on my motorcycle?

A: The best place to put your tracker is hidden under your fairings, as it’s less likely to be found by thieves, but this requires removing and reattaching them every time you need to recharge the unit. You could put it under your seat or the pillion seat, but it’s more likely to be discovered here by thieves.

Q: How long does it take to install a GPS tracker on my motorcycle?

A: There’s no direct answer to this question, as it depends on your motorcycle, GPS tracker, and where you choose to install it. It could take 30 seconds to install one in a magnetic box under your pillion seat or an hour to zip tie one to your frame when you include the time it takes to take off and put on your fairings.

Q: Do all motorcycle tracking devices require a subscription?

A: No, you could use something like an AirTag, which doesn’t require a subscription. But if you use a GPS tracking device, you’ll almost always need to have a subscription, as they operate off a satellite network.

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