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The Toyota Supra We All Begged for Is Going Away in Two Years: Report

Without BMW's partnership, Toyota doesn't seem likely to revive the Supra.
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It seems we may only have two years left with the reborn Toyota Supra. The joint venture between Toyota and BMW that birthed the Supra and BMW Z4 appears to be coming to an end, and there isn’t likely to be a replacement. According to Automotive News, production of the Zupra twins at Magna Steyr in Austria is ending in 2026.

BMW hasn’t been secret about its plans to end the Z4, after it recently extended production of its only two-seat roadster and gave it a manual transmission option. It’s also long been rumored to be the end of the Z4 model line as we know it, as BMW doesn’t have any public plans for a successor. But what about the Supra? Could Toyota have any plans for another model without BMW’s help?

“We have nothing to share at this time,” a Toyota represntative told The Drive.

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Of course, for Toyota to build a new Supra at this point, it would have to start from scratch. Without its partnership with BMW, Toyota would be on the hook to build an entirely new chassis and engine. Such a big investment might not be worthwhile, especially with Supra sales being down 50% this year. However, Toyota group vice president Dave Christ said “I think if we want to build something, we’ll figure out how to build it,” per Auto News.

The Supra, as well as most of Toyota’s recent sports cars, was championed by former CEO Akio Toyoda. Now, that Toyoda is no longer in charge, the brand might not prioritize a low-volume sports car like the Supra anymore, especially as it already offers many different options for enthusiasts under the GR umbrella. Toyota only sold a total of 24,022 Supras in the United States since it launched in 2019, compared to the 30,323 Camrys it sold in March 2024. Considering that, any hesitation to heavily invest in another Supra is unfortunately understandable.

Hopefully, this isn’t the last we see of the Supra. Even though this generation is more of a BMW—it uses a BMW-developed chassis, engine, and interior—it’s still a great sports car with a killer design. Maybe Toyota can find a new partner if BMW isn’t interested anymore, to ease the financial burden and keep its iconic nameplate alive.

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