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GM Plans to Supply Formula 1 Power Units Starting in 2028

This means Andretti—should it be allowed into F1—will need a different engine supplier for its first two or three years.
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General Motors confirmed Tuesday morning that it has officially registered with the Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA) as a Formula 1 engine manufacturer.

Specifically, the American automaker outlined that starting in 2028 it will be a power unit manufacturer. Per the current FIA regulations, this means an internal combustion engine and accompanying hybrid motors.

This news comes six weeks after the FIA approved Andretti Formula Racing’s Expression of Interest, greenlighting the possible return of the Andretti dynasty to the pinnacle of motorsport. As we’ve said before, this brings Andretti and GM closer to the F1 grid in the near future, but there’s still a long way to go. The business end of F1—Liberty Media and the racing teams—have made it clear that they don’t want Andretti in the picture, now, or ever.

A press image GM released alongside the power unit supplier announcement. General Motors

GM did not reveal any more details about its latest development, though company president Mark Reuss said in no uncertain terms last week that it’s only interested in going Grand Prix racing with Andretti and no one else.

“GM is committed to partnering with Andretti to race in F1,” said Reuss on Nov. 8. “The collaboration between Andretti-Cadillac brings together two unique entities built for racing, both with long pedigrees of success in motorsport globally.”

It’s been previously reported that Andretti had a tentative engine supplier deal with Renault, though that seems to have evaporated over the summer. FIA president Mohammed Ben Sulayem has gone on record saying that Andretti will not be left without an engine supplier for its first couple of years in F1, but of course, that assumes Andretti is actually allowed a seat at the table.

The American team is hoping to begin competing in F1 by 2025 or 2026, meaning that it will need to kick off its tenure with an engine other than GM’s. Should GM’s program go according to plan, Andretti would then switch to a Cadillac-branded power unit in 2028.

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