Reviews | The Drive

Best Truck Tires: Take Your Land Barge To The Next Level

From mud-slinging to hypermiling, we’ve got you covered.

With decades of combined experience covering the latest news, reviewing the greatest gear, and advising you on your next car purchase, The Drive is the leading authority on all things automotive.

youtubefacebookinstagram

The Drive and its partners may earn a commission if you purchase a product through one of our links. Read more.

BYJeric Jaleco/ LAST UPDATED ON June 13, 2022

It doesn’t take a brainiac to say that truck tires are probably the hottest tire market right now, especially in the Americas. Look outside and smell the fresh diesel as light-duty pickups of all makes and sizes continue to sweep sales out from under sedans and crossovers. Your landscaper, neighbor, and let’s not forget that you have one or you wouldn’t be here right now.


Fret not, fellow octane-blooded enthusiast. I present The Drive’s buyer’s guide to the best truck tires on the market today. From brutal winter snowstorms to long hauls to the moon and back, I’ve compiled this wildly varied list of truck tires to suit your needs. Enjoy one of our lengthiest, most comprehensive guides to date, and happy shopping.

Best Overall

Yokohama Geolandar A/T G015

Summary
Yokohama presents their take on a high-quality, do-it-all tire that’s just as capable on the highway as it is at Hell’s Gate.
Pros
  • A livable street tire with an adventurous side
  • Decent snow traction and 3PMSF-rated
  • Easy, predictable road handling
  • Well-mannered and refined
Cons
  • Some harsh impacts over bumps
  • Mild road noise
  • Not the most focused for off-road excursions
Best Value

Firestone Destination LE3

Summary
Firestone’s Destination LE3 blesses the frugal with long tread life and commendable all-around performance.
Pros
  • Agreeable price slots well below premium brands
  • Strong overall performer that stands with premium tires
  • One of the quieter choices 
  • Mostly cozy ride quality
Cons
  • Some harsh impacts over bumps
  • Rivals are marginally better in winter weather
  • Not the easiest to push in emergency driving situations
Honorable Mention

Michelin Agilis CrossClimate

Summary
Michelin brings the glory of the CrossClimate all-season line to trucks by pairing fantastic wet and snow traction with solid on-road handling.
Pros
  • Great traction for inclimate weather and mild off-roading
  • Resilient and long-lasting
  • Stable and durable for towing
  • Appreciable on-road handling
Cons
  • Stray far from serious off-road trails
  • That good ol’ Michelin price tag
Best Truck Tires: Take Your Land Barge To The Next Level

Summary List 

Honorable Mention: Michelin Agilis CrossClimate

Best for F-150: General Grabber AT/X

Best for Silverado: Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac

Why Trust Us

Our reviews are driven by a combination of hands-on testing, expert input, “wisdom of the crowd” assessments from actual buyers, and our own expertise. We always aim to offer genuine, accurate guides to help you find the best picks.

Learn more

Our Methodology

It’s in our best interest as journalists and fellow gearheads to bring you the most informative yet honest reviews possible in every buyer’s guide. That said, it’s not quite feasible to source a dozen tires to test on a dozen trucks, but that hasn’t stopped me from supplementing hands-on tire tests with strenuous and extensive research. I dived deep into retail giant, Tire Rack, and their expansive database of expert opinions, objective test numbers, and, most importantly, real-world consumer experience to curate the absolute best tires for this guide. Various truck forums aided in gathering information on OEM tire selections for manufacturer-specific categories. Readers are encouraged to learn more about how The Drive generally curates its buyers guides and product reviews.

Best Truck Tire Reviews & Recommendations

Specs

  • Manufacturer: Yokohama
  • Tire Type: All-terrain
  • Speed Rating: R

Pros

  • A livable street tire with an adventurous side
  • Decent snow traction and 3PMSF-rated
  • Easy, predictable road handling
  • Well-mannered and refined

Cons

  • Some harsh impacts over bumps
  • Mild road noise
  • Not the most focused for off-road excursions

The Yokohama Geolandar A/T G015 swept across the internet like wildfire earning the praise of professional testers and consumers from all over. A quick glance at its design instantly tells you of its intent to be a jack-of-all-trades tire with a talent for nearly anything, even if it isn’t the most focused on one core subject. Professionals and consumers laud the easygoing and predictable on-road dynamics, which blew people away with how an all-terrain tire can perform. A 3PMSF rating denotes commendable traction in wet and light snow conditions, while the moderately aggressive tread pattern ensures it can still handle the occasional overlanding adventure. Multiple owners reported a surprising degree of traction on incredibly challenging surfaces such as wet grass and muddy trails.

Attempting to be the Jack of All Trades almost always means never mastering any, and the well-received Yoko is no exception. The mostly well-mannered ride can be upset by sharp bumps, which can send some harsh impacts into the cabin. Mild road noise has been reported, and the tread pattern is clearly not the most focused design for really getting down with some nitty-gritty terrain.

Specs

  • Manufacturer: Firestone
  • Tire Type: Highway all-season
  • Speed Rating: R

Pros

  • Agreeable price slots well below premium brands
  • Strong overall performer that stands with premium tires
  • One of the quieter choices
  • Mostly cozy ride quality

Cons

  • Some harsh impacts over bumps
  • Rivals are marginally better in winter weather
  • Not the easiest to push in emergency driving situations

Undercutting many of its premium rivals by tens, if not hundreds of dollars, the Firestone Destination LE3 is a rock-solid choice for truck owners who seldom leave the pavement. Positioning itself among other highway all-season tires, its relatively inoffensive design grants it exceptional refinement and tread life, especially for its class. Many consumers regularly report tread life over 50,000 miles. But of course, monitor your tires and change accordingly. In some cases, owners have also reported fuel economy bumps of a couple of miles per gallon. Handling is stellar for a truck tire with natural steering feel and commendable traction in the wet. Some owners have even praised its ability to remain composed in light snow and ice.

The less expensive route will always come with caveats. The Firestone’s traction reportedly tapers off quite rapidly when pushed past its limits in emergency driving situations. While snow traction is decent, rivals are marginally better in every performance metric. The ride quality is as supple as you’d want from a highway all-season, but sharp bumps can still send some jitters throughout the truck.

Specs

  • Manufacturer: Michelin
  • Tire Type: Highway all-season
  • Speed Rating: R

Pros

  • Great traction for inclement weather and mild off-roading
  • Resilient and long-lasting
  • Stable and durable for towing
  • Appreciable on-road handling

Cons

  • Stray far from serious off-road trails
  • That good ol’ Michelin price tag

Michelin’s Agilis CrossClimate brings the glory of the lauded CrossClimate range to your rolling metal leviathan. Initially designed for cargo vans and other commercial vehicles, these tires have developed a dedicated fanbase among SUV and light truck owners for pairing strong load ratings with genuine all-weather usability. Their blocky tread scarred by a bounty of siping makes for excellent wet and light snow traction, and owners have even reported some usefulness on sand and gravel surfaces. Pseudo all-terrain, perhaps? In typical CrossClimate fashion, its pursuit of year-round capability doesn’t sacrifice much in dry handling and comfort as the Agilis CrossClimate has earned frequent compliments for a relatively smooth ride and predictable dynamics.

As one of the most acclaimed tires on this list, finding significant faults proved to be the bigger challenge. You definitely wouldn’t take these to do real off-roading as traction tapers off as trails get trickier, so keep to the streets. Oh, and you can’t brush off that Michelin price tag which ranks as one of the most expensive on this list, especially for a highway all-season.

Specs

  • Manufacturer: BFGoodrich
  • Tire Type: All-terrain
  • Speed Rating: R

Pros

  • Surprisingly refined for such a macho tire
  • Appreciably responsive steering for its class
  • Conquer and crush nearly anything in your path
  • Class leader in the snow

Cons

  • Firm ride quality
  • Not-so-linear breakaway on wet roads

The BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2 has long been the Holy Grail of off-road rubber for a good reason. From being the choice tire for homebrewed rally cars to an OEM pick for Jeeps and Raptors, this item rewards customers with excellent off-road capability and well-behaved street driving. Drivers frequently report their astonishment over the quietness and on-road comfort of the KO2 versus rival all-terrains, although the Yoko Geolandar A/T G015 arguably has it beat as a street tire. But there’s no denying this is the better choice for Baja wannabes or Rubicon warriors. On an interesting note for snowstorm connoisseurs, the KO2 is a class leader in Tire Rack’s winter testing with significantly better acceleration, cornering, and braking over even the Yoko.

Breakaway characteristics at the limit and on wet roads are reportedly abrupt and tricky to manage, so be careful before going all Takumi Fujiwara-mode in your lifted Tacoma. Ride quality is supple for an all-terrain but still a tad firm, firmer than most street-oriented truck tires.

Specs

  • Manufacturer: BFGoodrich
  • Tire Type: All-terrain
  • Speed Rating: Off-road maximum traction

Pros

  • Well-mannered and stable for its class
  • Relatively quick steering response
  • Now, really conquer everything before you

Cons

  • Typical mud tire road noise
  • Poorer snow and wet traction than most all-terrains
  • Among the pricier choices on this list

A previous Best Overall winner, the BFGoodrich Mud-Terrain T/A KM3 takes what makes the KO2 a sledgehammer off the beaten path and cranks it up a couple of notches. Tread blocks reminiscent of map topography aided by stone ejectors and BFG’s Traction-Armor Sidewall Structure greatly enhance grip and resiliency over rocks, mud, and sand. Surprisingly, the Tonka truck aesthetic doesn’t stop it from delivering reasonably quick steering responses and decent ride quality for the street.

As good as it is, that’s simply being good for a mud tire. You should expect a stiffer and nosier ride than most all-terrains and all-seasons. Additionally, expect abysmal snow traction versus all-seasons and some all-terrains as the widely-spaced tread blocks and lack of siping make for an inadequate surface for clinging to that annoying white stuff.

Specs

  • Manufacturer: Michelin
  • Tire Type: Highway all-season
  • Speed Rating: R

Pros

  • Super long tread life
  • Quiet, compliant ride
  • Stable and durable for towing
  • Solid inclimate weather performance

Cons

  • Agilis CrossClimate is likely more suited for winters
  • Some reported inconsistencies in tread life

Another critically-acclaimed hit from the French giant, the Michelin Defender LTX M/S is arguably the best tire for long haulers. Ride and road noise are reportedly excellent and deliver a refined cruising experience indicative of a premium brand’s work. Owners regularly report 60,000 to 80,000 of life, with one owner reporting as high as 130,000. Kudos to Michelin’s reinforced Evertread rubber compound, although we always encourage monitoring your own tires and replacing them accordingly. Their sturdy construction makes them stable and competent companions for towing and carrying payloads, and their grip in wet and forgiving winters is confidence-inspiring.

As perfect as they seem, the Defenders have had numerous inconsistencies in their reported tread life. Most consumers report incredibly long life spans, but a handful struggles to breach 30,000. Whether this is a matter of poor wheel alignment or harsh road conditions is unknown. And as grippy as these tires are in inclimate weather, there’s no doubt that the Agilis CrossClimate or a dedicated winter tire will eclipse it in a blizzard.

Specs

  • Manufacturer: Michelin
  • Tire Type: Light-truck/SUV winter
  • Speed Rating: R

Pros

  • Dominates snow and ice
  • Best-in-class on-road refinement
  • Direct steering feel

Cons

  • Typical winter tire limitations in warmer months
  • Minimal tiring sizing

The Michelin Latitude X-Ice Xi2 is a purpose-built solution to the Snowbelt resident’s winter woes. Where many winter tires are designed to work best with passenger cars and family crossovers, the Latitude X-Ice translates that performance into a package fit for light-duty pickups and large SUVs. The directional tread pattern, in the same spirit as the CrossClimate all-season line, helps evacuate moisture as quickly as possible while Michelin’s Cross-Z siping claws at ice and snow. The sipes also reinforce the shoulders for better steering feel and sharper precision in the corners, thus creating a product Tire Rack has praised for best-in-class refinement.

At the time of writing, however, sizing is quite limited, meaning aftermarket wheels should also be a consideration for truck owners hoping to stop their slip-n-slide troubles in harsh winters. And don’t forget the typical winter tire drawbacks once the temps start to climb, such as accelerated tire wear and sluggish handling.

Specs

  • Manufacturer: General Tire
  • Tire Type: All-terrain
  • Speed Rating: R

Pros

  • OEM tire of choice for F-150 and Ranger Tremors
  • Solid snow handling for its class
  • Commendable on-road handling
  • A willing partner for roads less traveled

Cons

  • Some reported issues with balancing
  • Ho-hum wet traction

The OEM choice for Ford Tremor trucks is here to be the perfect OEM+ upgrade for fellow Blue Oval fans. General’s Grabber AT/X is a robust and capable all-terrain tire for owners looking for a little more edge. While not as aggressive as other all-terrains, the tread pattern is perfectly at home on the trail without hurting its on-road refinement. Road noise is present but unobtrusive, and comfort is quite good. Handling is admirable with sharp steering with Tire Rack staff having no issue hustling their F-150 test vehicle around their course. Like the KO2 it competes with, snow traction is usable enough to make it viable in some winter situations.

Exercise caution when deciding on the Grabbers. A small handful of consumers have reported difficulties with wheel balancing and have experienced vibrations that they could never get quite sorted. And while snow traction is stout, wet traction is only tolerable with rivals able to stick for far longer before losing their hold on the tarmac.

Best for Chevrolet Silverado 1500
Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac
Check Latest Price

Specs

  • Manufacturer: Goodyear
  • Tire Type: All-terrain
  • Speed Rating: R

Pros

  • OEM tire of choice for Silverado Trail Boss
  • Long-lasting and quiet for its class
  • Commendable off-road performance
  • Usable mud and snow traction

Cons

  • Not-so-confident in the wet
  • Mild road noise gets very loud with age

Goodyear’s Wrangler Duratrac can stand as a worthy OEM tire for the Trail Bosses of today or as a significant upgrade for the Z71s of decades past. The jagged tread pattern appears as though it can cut you just by looking at it, yet comfort is decent with mostly quiet operation. Zig-zagging sipes and Goodyear’s TractiveGroove system create a highly abrasive biting edge for mud and snow, earning it the M+S rating. Another wild card up its sleeve is the reportedly long tread life despite its aggressive design, with some owners reporting life spans that match some highway all-seasons.

Unlike the Grabber AT/X favored by the Blue Oval, this tire demonstrates the interesting trait of having meaningful snow traction but okay-ish wet traction. On a separate note, the initially-subtle road noise has been noted to gradually ramp up to mud tire levels as the Goodyears reach the latter end of their life spans.

Specs

  • Manufacturer: Bridgestone
  • Tire Type: Highway All-Season
  • Speed Rating: R

Pros

  • Long-lasting tread life
  • Cozy and quiet ride
  • Stable, confidence-inspiring handling
  • Usable light snow traction

Cons

  • Definitely steer clear of ice and deeper snow
  • Tread life pales in comparison to other highway all-seasons

For years, the Ram 1500, especially the current generation, has been regarded as having the superior road manners and being the better street car among light-duty trucks. Bridgestone’s Dueler H/L Alenza Plus aims to play on that advantage by delivering the best road driving experience a truck can have. Quiet, comfortable operation is the order of the day for tires that can bring the most car-like quality out of Ram trucks. Dry and wet traction are both strong, and one owner gave compliments for its usable degree of grip on dusty trails.

Being one of the most street-oriented tires on this list does mean that this is perhaps the worst tire for exploring roads less traveled, so know the limits. Snow traction is only okay, but lacks the surefootedness of a 3PMSF or M+S tire. While some owners have reported tread life as high as 80,000 miles, most reports hover between 30,000 to 60,000, undercutting the best highway all-seasons.

Our Verdict

Standing atop one of the most comprehensive tire guides we’ve made, Yokohama’s Geolandar G015 is a stellar choice for truck buyers who want to try all the things that truck people do. Firestone’s Destination LE3 easily sprints away as the Best Value pick for putting up a good impression of a premium all-season at a budget price. And Michelin’s Agilis CrossClimate deserves an honorable mention for delivering on the promise of an ultra-capable street tire for year-round hauling.  

Things to Consider Before Buying Truck Tires

Winter Tires

Winter tires for trucks are no different than their car-centric counterparts; they’re merely upscaled and toughened for their new, burlier machines. Softer, high-silica rubber compounds resist freezing in extreme cold, and jagged tread patterns with plentiful siping create abrasive edges for literally clawing at snow and ice. Their downfall comes in warmer months as they soften with the heat, bringing with them compromised tread life and sluggish driving dynamics. For places where winters are way less harsh, consider three-peak mountain snowflake (3PMSF) all-seasons or Mud & Snow (M+S), which add a few winter tire traits for true year-round usability.

Off-Road Tires

Pretty self-explanatory, huh? These are your massive, burly options defined by Minecraft-esque tread patterns designed to claw at sand, fling up mud, and scale up rock walls. These are tires for trucks that live off the beaten tarmac and spend weekends searching for new campsites or living out wannabe Baja racer fantasies. All-terrains are quite competent at traversing most surfaces in most weather conditions. Hyper-focused mud tires may elevate their off-road prowess with blockier tread, stone ejectors, and sidewall guards at the expense of noise and comfort. Generally, most off-road tires will have some sort of refinement trade-off versus a more street-oriented all-season.

Highway All-Season

On the most sedate end of the truck tire scale sits a nice, cozy highway all-season. As the name suggests, they’re street-oriented rubber with a focus on another truck strong suit: long-distance hauling. These are highly-resilient tires for literally going the extra mile, just like your extended range fuel tanks, and deliver the quietest, most refined road manners for trucks. Some tires are specifically toughened up for towing or use on cargo vans and heavy-duty trucks, and some may come 3PMSF-rated for year-round usability in light snow and cold weather.

Truck Tire Pricing 

Expect most truck tires to eclipse many passenger car and crossover tires in pricing with wide price disparities depending on tire category and sizing. Most truck tires for an 18-inch wheel will run you anywhere between $250 to $350 per piece or roughly $1,000 to $1,400 per set of four. The ultra-aggressive BFGoodrich Mud-Terrain T/A KM3 costs about $230 in its smallest 15-inch size and up to $660 in its largest 22-inch size. The far more streetable Michelin Defender LTX M/S with similar sizing ranges between $146 to $333 per tire. Our Best Value-winning Firestone ranges from $155 to $241 per tire. Of course, add an extra tire to your total cost if a complete set includes a full-size spare wheel. 

FAQs 

You’ve got questions. The Drive has answers.

Q: Can I drive mud tires in the winter?

A: Don’t even think about it. These are generally regarded as the worst truck tires for winter due to their lack of siping and widely-spaced tread blocks, which are incapable of adequately grabbing at snow. Their stiff rubber, great for toughness, is a detriment in extreme cold.

Q: Can I use all-seasons in the winter?

A: Maybe. The answer is usually no, but some all-seasons, particularly those sporting the 3PMSF rating, will fare far better than others and can function as true all-seasons thanks to a higher-silica compound and extra tread siping. Even some all-terrains with the M+S rating can fair well in light snow.

Q: Can I tow with any truck tire?

A: Yes. Truck tires will often be constructed with some degree of workmanship in mind, but some will be better than others. Those with the LT or “light truck” metric denote added toughness. Most truck tires also have alphabetical load indexes to quantify their maximum ply count and air pressure.

Q: Will car and crossover tires work for a truck?

A: I’m sure the mad lads that slapped Falken Wildpeaks on econoboxes proved that you could put any tire on any vehicle. But car tires on a truck is a risky proposal that may lead to accelerated wear and premature failure as well as poor handling and towing stability.

Q: Where can I recycle my old truck tires?

A: Depending on where you live, there may be a lot of hidden options for ditching your old scrap tires. Some towns or cities may have dedicated tire recycling centers, or some auto parts stores may recycle them for you. Some dumps may have specialized departments for taking in old tires.

stripe
stripe