Chevy Dealer Allegedly Wrecked a Racer’s Camaro ZL1 While Joyriding

The customer reportedly instructed the dealer not to drive the car off the lot, but the service techs didn't listen.
Chevrolet

The Chevy Camaro is no more. The bowtie brand recently killed off the iconic nameplate, never to return on a gas-powered pony car (though, who knows what sort of electrified future it may have). So you can imagine the anger and frustration of racing driver Kenny Habul, when he found out that a dealership service technician allegedly crashed and totaled his Camaro ZL1 1LE, reportedly worth $97,000.

According to Automotive News, Habul towed his ZL1 “Hendrick Edition” to H&L Chevrolet in Darien, Connecticut, since it wouldn’t start. He reportedly instructed the dealership that “under no circumstances” could they drive it off the lot. Now Habul is reportedly suing the dealership because not only did service technicians drive it off the lot, but they supposedly crashed it, too.

Chevrolet

Service advisor Matthew Sebastian, along with a co-worker, were said to have taken the the Camaro ZL1 onto I-95 and struck a guardrail at 89 mph. The car only had 989 miles on it. The lawsuit alleges that the Camaro’s factory track data recorder showed Sebastian accelerating hard right before the crash while also not wearing his seatbelt. Sebastian was also ticketed for failing to stay in his lane. Thankfully, it doesn’t seem as if any other cars were involved in the crash, and no one was hurt.

The lawsuit is seeking compensatory and punitive damages from the dealership, as it alleges that the dealership is responsible for its employees’ behavior. However, even if Habul gets the monetary payout he desires in the lawsuit, he’s still out a Camaro ZL1. And while he’ll likely be able to buy another one, it’ll have to be used.

Of course, even with a payout equivalent to the car’s value, Habul could buy a brand-new Corvette, which is faster and more exotic-looking. However, the Camaro holds a special place in many enthusiasts’ hearts, as one of the last rear-wheel-drive, V8-powered, manual American sports cars. Especially the ZL1 1LE, with its 650-horsepower, 6.2-liter supercharged V8, Multimatic spool-valve dampers, and carbon-fiber aero. Vehicles like it are a rarity today, and losing one to sheer recklessness is the last thing anyone wants to see.

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