Stubby Plymouth Duster Is a Flamboyant Roofless Deathtrap

Just watch the short wheelbase doesn’t get you into trouble.

byLewin Day| UPDATED Dec 20, 2021 8:35 PM
Stubby Plymouth Duster Is a Flamboyant Roofless Deathtrap
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American muscle cars are renowned for their power and style, but they were never known for being small. This Plymouth Duster seeks to rectify that, with the former cover car chopped up into a new pocket-sized form. This lurid example of 70s excess could be yours, currently being sold by WeBe Autos.

That's right, for the low price of just $12,971, you could have a heavily-modified 1971 Plymouth Duster, complete with a 360 cubic inch V8 under the hood. It looks to be non-original to the car, as the 5.9-liter LA V8 wasn't available until the 1974 model year. Assuming it's from a later-model Duster, it would have been good for around 225-245 horsepower, and here it drives the rear wheels through an automatic gearbox.

The top of the car has been chopped off to stunning effect; the Duster shape works well as a convertible. With that said, there's no roof to speak of, so rain is a concern. Unlike other choptop builds, there don't appear to be doors, either. The aesthetics are glorious, though, with a cocaine-white interior with full tuck-and-roll upholstery all round.  

The searing yellow and green paint does wonders, too, and was apparently enough to make this a cover car on "a Mopar magazine" at one point. There's also a tasteful hood scoop up front, and the car rides on standard-issue slot mags.

However, the sale listing does state that the vehicle's paint "is older and reflects it's age." Some chipping and surface rust is apparent, mostly around the trunk, and much of the yellow paint appears dirty or faded. It's a shame, as clearly a great deal of effort was once expended to achieve this look. 

The Duster is claimed to be "a great running and driving fun novelty car." Questions may be raised over the attention paid to maintenance over the years, though, with an "ECONO POWER" battery perhaps speaking louder than words. The engine bay has a strange patina to it; almost as if it had been attacked with only the finest, cheapest red and black spray paint in an attempt to glam things up. We could be wrong, but there appears to be evidence of a bad spray job on the intake in particular. 

If you've got $13,000 to blow and you really don't care what happens to it, this car could be a very fun way to rock up to your local Cars and Coffee. Alternatively, it may be best left as a project for the Roadkillers and YouTubers out there, who love to suffer at the altar of exciting-but-flawed custom cars.

With a tiny wheelbase, no roof, and a driveshaft that you can only hope was modified correctly, this one has sketchy written all over it. That doesn't mean we wouldn't jump at the chance to drive it, though.  

Got a tip? Let the author know: lewin@thedrive.com