IndyCar Re-Ups Turbocharger Alliance With BorgWarner Through 2020

The turbo supplier has provided hardware for 1.25 million miles of racing, and now, they'll continue their alliance for the next two seasons.

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BorgWarner, an important and instantly recognizable name within the IndyCar circle, will continue to serve as the series' sole turbocharger provider through 2020, the company revealed on Wednesday. 

The two parties began their exclusive partnership in 2012 and, since then, have accumulated over 1.25 million miles using BorgWarner parts. A pair of the company's Engineered for Racing (EFR) turbos is fitted to both Chevrolet and Honda's race-spec, 2.2-liter V-6 engines and support upwards of 700 horsepower in competition applications.

“BorgWarner is honored to continue its partnership with INDYCAR and the IndyCar Series, America’s premier open-wheel racing series,” said Scott Gallett, vice president of marketing, public relations, government affairs, and internal communications at BorgWarner Inc. “Our EFR turbochargers are the perfect match for INDYCAR, with their advanced engineering, low weight, and proven durability, they truly are engineered for racing.”

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The turbo supplier's name adorns the Indianapolis 500 trophy and has since 1936, depicting the face of each Indy winner with every passing year.

The specific EFR turbochargers used in the current IndyCar formula are constructed with endurance in mind as well as major power. The use of low-weight Gamma-TiAI (titanium aluminide) turbine wheels and shaft assemblies make for near-immediate boost response, while dual-row ceramic ball bearing cartridges allow "more thrust capacity, durability, and turbine efficiency at low expansion ratios." These applied technologies ensure peak performance on superspeedways, short-track ovals, road courses, and city circuits.

This partnership renewal runs through the remaining years of the current IndyCar engine regulations, which are set to change in 2021. Then, engine displacement will be upped to 2.4-liters with anticipated power figures hovering around 900 hp. Though nothing is decided past 2020, BorgWarner explained to The Drive that it's open to evaluating future commitments with IndyCar once the time arrives. 

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