Tesla’s Shanghai Factory Cranks Out One New Model Y in the Time It Takes to Cook a Hot Pocket

Right now they're finishing 700 per day, which is also a lot of Hot Pockets.

tesla hot pocket production lead
JayinShanghai via YouTube

It's no secret that Tesla has manufacturing issues. Sometimes, work has to be done on cars after they arrive at the end-user, and glass roofs have flown off while driving, but all of this underlines the company's impressive sprint towards legacy automakers' level of production speed. Case-in-point, Tesla is producing a new Model Y every two minutes at its Shanghai facility, which is no small feat. That's about the time it takes to microwave a Hot Pocket, for all of you discerning foodies out there. If consistent, that translates into an annual production of 250,000 electric crossovers, according to InsideEVs.

We know this because of a visit to the facility by Chinese media organization Pacific Automotive Network, who toured the facility to not only inspect its production but apparently look into reports that the factory was disorganized and unsanitary. Those claims were apparently untrue, at least while the media was there. This is therefore not just some tweet by Elon Musk as members of the media witnessed a new Model Y rolling off the line every 120 seconds.

Tesla via YouTube

Now, to be clear, that level of production is very impressive for a new company like Tesla who had never made a car before 2008. It's less impressive in the scope of legacy automakers. Ford, for instance, makes a new F-150 every 52 seconds at its Dearborn truck plant, and other large automakers like Volkswagen and Hyundai/Kia can move even faster than that. VW's Wolfsburg plant, for instance, makes around 3,800 cars per day as compared to Tesla Shanghai's 700. Likewise, a new Hyundai rolls off the line every 12 seconds from the company's plant in Ulsan, South Korea, according to Popular Mechanics.

But that's only part of the story. Tesla is making 700 EVs per day, while legacy automakers are still mostly making regular combustion-engined cars. Tesla might just have a manufacturing edge when it comes to electric vehicles, and older automakers just getting into the game could have trouble contending with that, but time will tell.

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