MYCHANIC's Blade Multi-Function Work Light Shines Brightly: Review

It’s cordless, has bright LEDs, and is easily stored.

The MYCHANIC Blade Light
Mark Bach

An important tool in every mechanic’s arsenal is a good droplight. This hanging orb of sunshine used to feature a metal cage holding a single fragile light bulb. It never seemed to hang just right, and you could never shine light where you actually needed it. Now and then you’d forget it was there, brush up against the metal cage, and hop away with a nasty burn.

Thanks to modern ingenuity, however, we now have cordless, directional LED lamps. There’s no need for delicate filament bulbs with dangerously hot cages and annoying extension cords. That said, there are a multitude of options, sizes, and light strengths available to you through Amazon, Walmart, Home Depot, and other stores. How do you sift through the noise and find the one that best suits your preferred wrenching?  

The MYCHANIC in action.
Mark Bach

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You scroll on over to The Drive, that’s how. In today’s product deep dive, we’re looking at the Blade Multi-Function Compact Directional Work Light from MYCHANIC, which tops the list of available options with well-designed features that seemingly make this light a must-have for the toolbox or trunk. It includes all the normal features you’d expect, and some I didn't know I needed until I saw them in action. 

It’s compact, lightweight, and rechargeable with bright LEDs, and those are just a few reasons I may have come to love this light. Let’s dig deeper.

Unboxing the MYCHANIC Blade Multi-Function Work Light

The MYCHANIC-produced light fits in your hand easily and is a middle weight for this particular product category, weighing 1.4 pounds. The bright-green accents help it stand out in your toolbox, and it’s even got a magnetic strip so you can hang it on the side of your toolbox, under your hood, or garage racks for easy and quick access.

The MYCHANIC Blade light comes with a micro-USB charger, so it can be charged through an outlet, your car’s 12-volt or USB outlets, or from your computer, if you’re so inclined. One thing that helps, though — if you’re like me and have a truckload of chargers — is to place a label or piece of tape on the cords so you know which charger goes with which device. 

Since the Blade light folds to a compact 10-by-2.25-inch cylinder shape with the LEDs protected, you can stash it in your car since it also has an Emergency light mode.

The MYCHANIC Blade light magnetized to the side of a car.
Mark Bach

Magentic. 

Getting After It With the MYCHANIC Blade Multi-Function Light

  • Good: Handy and lightweight with bright LEDs, it’s a great work light.
  • Bad: There’s no indicator to show the status of its battery. Keep it charged.
  • Check Latest Price 

One of my favorite parts of the MYCHANIC’s Blade light is that it has a retractable metal hook on one end of the light so you can hang it securely from your hood to light up the engine compartment. It made it a breeze to change a set of plugs and wires, swap out an old oxygen sensor, and even install new carpet and insulation on my Chevrolet Camaro. 

If you don’t want to use the hook, you also have the option to use the magnetic strip to attach it to specific metal engine parts. You can even use the magnetic strip to attach it to a wheel well while changing a flat tire. It was even useful when organizing my garage. I use the magnet to slap the light onto a metal garage shelf so I can always find it.

Although the 18 LEDs emit a strong 250 lumens and are protected with a clear cover, you wouldn’t want to use it to try and illuminate your entire work area. It’s a handy and versatile package, but the Blade is most effective for up-close work rather than for creating a wide bath of light. When you need to see a specific hose or bolt up close, just move the light down closer and let the magnetic strip hold it in place using one of the engine’s metal parts. 

Illuminating an engine bay using the MYCHANIC Blade light.
Mark Bach

Let there be light!

What is beneficial is that the Blade unfolds 270 degrees, so you can position it where you need it. Best of all, the light itself easily swivels 360 degrees, so you can be sure to find that sweet spot where you actually need the light. That especially came in handy while rewiring my home-theater sound system.

When I first set it on a workbench in the safety of my garage, I wondered why the Blade came with two red Emergency light modes. I then imagined myself or someone I cared about stuck on the side of a highway at night. Stash it in the trunk, and you get the same work-light options if needed, but the addition of flashing red LEDs makes the Blade a great hazard light in a pinch. 

Battery life allows for about 3.5 hours of run time from the lithium-ion units, even with the lighting level on High. Eighteen LEDs provide 250 lumens of brightness. That’s not a ton, but it’s good enough for most applications. Frankly, it’s nice to just leave the light on while taking a break, rather than turning it on and off and worrying about losing battery power.

The MYCHANIC Blade light hanging from a car's open hood.
Mark Bach

Hangin' around. 

What’s Good About the MYCHANIC Blade Multi-Function Light

I love having this as a work light. It’s accessible, versatile, and easily charged and ready. With the magnetic strip, I can stick it to the metal shelf next to my toolbox, and it’s always easy to find. 

The LEDs emit a bright white light that never fails to light up the work area. Between the magnetic handle, the retractable clip, and its sturdy foot, I can always swivel the light to precisely where I need to see. Plus, the 3.5 hours of battery life means I can use it for almost any project without running out of power. 

What’s Not Great About the MYCHANIC Blade Multi-Function Light

For a handy work light that has just about everything, the Blade is missing one key component that every wireless electronic device should have: a state-of-charge display. Every major electronic has one but not the Blade. At the very least, it should have a warning light to show when the battery is nearly dead and needs to be charged.

After first charging the battery, I’ve always had enough charge and light for my needs — even after months left dormant. I realize battery life varies with the environment; cold weather as well as hot, sun-baked trucks are never great settings for lithium-ion batteries. The car, however, is where I will usually store this light. In order to maintain the charge, I just plug in the light every few months. Not everyone is as meticulous or remembers as well as I do, so a baked-in display or meter would be vastly beneficial to those more forgetful users.

The MYCHANIC Light folded up.
Mark Bach

Folded up.

Our Verdict on the MYCHANIC Blade Multi-Function Light

This is the perfect emergency light to stash in your car, as it will light up whatever focused area you need with bright white light. It’s ideal for emergency tire changes and the like. Plus, those red warning-light modes could be a lifesaver when you break down and need to wait for help. 

At home in the garage, this light will fit the bill, giving you light where and when you need it. It won’t light up the entire garage, but it’s ideal for under the hood or on the workbench. Even around the house, under the sink, or in a dark closet, it’ll come in handy. And with the magnet embedded in the handle, it is easy to store where you can always find it.

TL;DR Review
MYCHANIC Blade Multi-Function Light

At home in the garage, this light will fit the bill, giving you light where and when you need it.

FAQs About MYCHANIC Blade Multi Light

You’ve got questions. The Drive has answers.

Q. What's the warranty?

A. The company offers a one-year warranty for U.S. residents. You will need to register your purchase on the company’s website, though you'll be easily protected in case something goes wrong.

Q. What’s a lumen?

A. Lumens are a measure of light visible to the human eye. Many standard flashlights offer far fewer lumens than the Blade. Don’t stare at the Blade, though. Trust me.

Q. Where’s MYCHANIC based?

A. It’s in Portland, Tennessee. The company is a brand of the Delk Company, which was founded in 2001. 

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