This $265,000 Dodge Power Wagon Carryall Restomod Is the Ultimate National Park Explorer

Teddy Roosevelt would be all over this one.

Legacy Classic Trucks Resto Mod Oct 2019
Legacy Classic Trucks

Legacy Classic Trucks has rolled out some awesome examples of Americarna before, but the company's newest Dodge Power Wagon Carryall's maiden voyage to Yellowstone National Park makes us want to revisit the company's world-class exploration rigs.

Established in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Legacy Classic Trucks specializes in full-size classic truck restomods, from the Power Wagon you see here to Chevy NAPCO pickups and other hunks of vintage 'murican cars. The team essentially takes the nostalgiac workhorses and restores them from the ground up while modernizing them in the process, similar to how Singer modifies air-cooled Porsche 911s.

This particular "Woodie" model has a 5.7-liter Hemi under the hood, which provides all the grunt needed to turn the massive earth-pounding tires. It's also had a disc brake conversion—a plus in any vehicle—and the modification list is extensive, to say the least. It all boils down to the company giving its customers the option to spec their trucks' engine, transmission, driveline, and exterior modifications. With available doo-dads such as pneumatic front and rear differential lockers to heavy-duty winches and incredibly tough Atlas transfer cases, you'll never need more special equipment—so long as you've got the cash to pay for it all.

Anyone these days can buy a new truck or SUV and fit it with expensive off-roading equipment, but it takes more time and dedication to bring 50-year-old vehicles such as this back to life. And this is far more than the factory-spec restoration job—instead, it's a nut-and-bolt undertaking that also adds luxurious amenities and rugged four-wheeling capability. That's why these cost a bare minimum of $265,000 to churn out, and that's before you factor in the optional extras.

Aside from all that, it just looks right, especially with the majestic Wyoming landscape behind it. We know Teddy Roosevelt was proud of his pony, but if this type of truck was around back in the day, he'd probably be first on the reservation list.