Salvage Teslas Could Use Superchargers Again Under New Program: Report

Tesla has flip-flopped on whether salvaged cars should be able to fast-charge for years now. But it may finally be warming to the idea.

byJames Gilboy| PUBLISHED Nov 10, 2022 5:11 PM
Salvage Teslas Could Use Superchargers Again Under New Program: Report
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Tesla has bounced back and forth for years on whether it should let salvage-titled EVs fast-charge. Now, it has reportedly settled on a decision: Yes, provided the rebuilt cars pass an inspection.

Tesla initially permitted salvaged cars to fast-charge until 2020, when it disabled the function both for the Supercharger network and third-party chargers as part of its unsupported vehicle policy. The company alleged this was down to safety problems in light of the growing popularity of refurbishing Teslas, though it offered no path for rebuilt vehicles to be approved for fast charging. In 2021, Tesla reportedly reactivated fast-charging for all cars, before again deactivating it a week later. Now, citing "internal Tesla documents," Electrek claims Tesla is setting up a system that will allow repaired cars to regain full charging functionality.

Tesla Model S. Tesla

In a document titled "Salvaged-Titled Vehicle Fast Charging Safety Inspection," Tesla reportedly outlines a process that salvaged cars can again utilize fast-chargers. The vehicles in question must undergo an inspection of their high-voltage systems to verify their integrity. If any component should fail the inspection (whose process was not specified), the car will require further diagnosis and repair by the customer. After repairs are made (if needed), Tesla will reenable fast-charging to perform a charging test. If the vehicle passes that test, fast-charging is back on

The process encompasses all models of Tesla, implying everything from the original Roadster to the Semi, supposedly just weeks from its first delivery.

If Tesla is preparing this procedure as reported, it'll almost certainly be available only through its service centers and not independent shops. Tesla famously once quoted $16,000 for a repair a third party was able to perform for $700, so such a scenario doesn't seem beyond the realm of possibility.

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