NYPD Cop Pleads Guilty to Writing Fake Tickets to Fake People to Get Paid Overtime

One of the imaginary cyclists Officer Shepard had the cojones of ticketing was named "Carlos DeJesus."

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A former officer of the New York Police Department (NYPD) was busted for issuing citations to people who didn't exist for crimes that were never committed. The scam, according to a report by the New York Post, was to claim these infractions were happening when overtime applied to his pay rate. In other words, he was milking the clock.

Forty-nine-year-old Varon Shepard pleaded guilty in a Manhattan Criminal Court last week to filing a "false instrument," according to the original report. It's not outlined how many times Shepard had done this, but one specific and recent example as used as proof or his wrongdoings.

Shepard's supervisor claims that during one specific instance, Shepard was observed inside the 17th Precinct station house in Manhattan until 12:45 p.m. on Feb. 25. However, a citation issued to a cyclist named "Carlos DeJesus" was dated Feb. 25th at 11:00 a.m., meaning that DeJesus had to be riding his bicycle inside the building or the whole thing was a fake. Obviously, it wasn't hard to figure out which one of those was true.

No DeJesus was found at the made-up address listed on the citation, and Shepard was given a conditional discharge from the NYPD. The only condition? To quit his job.

Several NYPD officers have been on the spotlight recently for a variety of shenanigans. Earlier last month, we reported about a reckless NYC cop who had racked up 75 speeding tickets in two years, with 53 of them being for speeding, and several others for running red lights.