Jeep Wrangler Built by Students Is Being Actioned off to Benefit School Program

A total of 23 aftermarket companies donated equipment to the high school students for this project.

Bring a Trailer

A SEMA-shown Jeep Wrangler that was custom-built by a magnet high school in New Mexico is being auctioned to benefit the same group of kids that built it. The proceeds of the sale will be used to fund another automotive project for students.

The 2015 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited is the result of a partnership between the Santa Fe Early College Opportunities Auto Tech School and SEMA, which through a tech-training program allowed high school students to build this one-of-a-kind Jeep. In addition to the SEMA sponsorship, a total of 23 automotive aftermarket companies donated over $20,000 worth of parts ranging from wheels to suspension components and even a winch. Because a hardcore Jeep isn't complete without a winch.

The off-road beast has only seen 14,500 miles of road and is currently listed without reserve on Bring a Trailer with six days left and a $50,000 bid. According to the listing, SEMA will donate 100 percent of the winning bid to the school so they can get to work on another cool automotive project, and even Bring a Trailer will contribute the 5 percent buyer's fee they normally charge.

The aftermarket equipment is hefty with this one, but some of the most noteworthy tweaks took place under the hood and chassis. The original 3.6-liter Pentastar V-6 received a healthy dose of oomph courtesy of an Edelbrock supercharger and a wide variety air-intake goodies from K&N Engineering, including a snorkel. The exhaust system was also overhauled with a cat-back single-exit exhaust kit courtesy of Flowmaster.

Running over logs and crawling over boulders will be a whole lot easier thanks to ICON shocks with remote reservoirs and adjustable trackbars in the front and rear. Of course, the rolling stock was also upgraded with 17-inch Rebound wheels wrapped with 37-inch Atturo Trail Blade BOSS tires.

"This is the first time we've done something like this, and it was about so much more than just outfitting a Jeep," Chris Coriz, the school's auto-tech teacher and program manager told The Drive. "Together with SEMA, we documented the entire project to build a curriculum that other schools can follow. We are proud to be the pilot for what will be a great program. The proceeds of the sale of the Jeep will go a very long way."

If you're looking for a summer toy and a great cause to benefit, you may have just hit the jackpot.