Electric Trucks Help BMW Plant Reduce Emissions

By using just three electric trucks BMW has cut down its CO2 emissions by 82 tons a year.

Too often, companies, people, and governments don’t practice what they preach. They take a “Do as I say, not as I do” approach. In the interests of lowering global emissions, BMW is putting its money where its mouth is. The company announced three electric trucks as part of its logistics operations in the group’s home plant in Munich, Germany. It estimates that the use of the electric trucks will help reduce its CO2 emissions by approximately 82 tons a year.

All three of the vehicles are used to provide various services on public roads throughout Munich. One transports new cars on a 9.3-mile trek, taking them from the town of Garching to the BMW Welt. A second truck covers a route between the BMW Group Plant and partner SCHERM Group’s logistic center. The truck makes the trip eight times a day. This second truck has a top speed of about 25 mph but has been plodding along since being put into service in July 2015.

The third e-truck has a range of about 100 miles and a top speed of around 40 mph. This truck delivers vehicle components from SCHERM’S supply center in Karlsfeld, approximately seven miles outside of Munich, to the BMW Plant inside the city.

BMW AG

One of the three electric trucks used along BMW's supply chain

Dr. Milan Nedeljkovic, Director of BMW Group Plant Munich said, “With three electric trucks, we are setting another strong example for resource-saving production in the heart of Munich. We are proud to be a pioneer in sustainable city logistics since 2015 and to make a contribution to reducing emissions in the city by around 82 tonnes."

The electric trucks are part of the BMW Groups “Number one > Next” strategy. The strategy prioritizes e-mobility, digitalization and autonomous driving as the technologies of the future. With this and its recent electric car-sharing partnership in China, BMW is making strides towards an emission-free future.