Actionable Intel: Defense News Roundup For April 25th, 2021

From China commissioning three major naval vessels at once to the loss of Indonesia's submarine, we roundup all of today's military news so you don't have to.

Unmanned Systems Integrated Battle Problem 21
Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet—Public Domain

It's been a long time since we have done one of these roundups of all the news that is important enough for us to mention, and some extra fun content, as well, but I feel like today warranted it. So here are the key happenings from around the globe and the net in terms of defense and the military that you need to know about.

Terrible news about the lost Indonesian sub

KRI Nanggala has been found and its complement of 54 souls has been lost. 

We reported on Friday that air was running out as more international assets poured into the region to help in the search. Sadly, their efforts couldn't save the crew. At 838 meters, well below crush depth for the submarine and beyond the reach of submarine rescue systems, a recovery effort wouldn't have been possible anyway, from what we understand.

Chinese Navy super commissioning ceremony

The People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) had a three-way commissioning ceremony that also highlighted some of its most advanced capabilities. The Type 094 nuclear ballistic missile submarine Cangzheng, the Type 055 destroyer Dalian, and the Type 075 LHD Hainan were all brought into service at Sanya Naval Base on the 72nd Anniversary of the PLAN. 

The ceremony was also a testimony to how much seapower Beijing has been able to spit out as of late. Truly astonishing production numbers, including its most advanced types. 

Bonus pics of the Type 075 LHD loaded up out at sea:

Chinese State Media
Chinese State Media
Chinese State Media

Iranian tanker struck by a drone off Syria

It looks like the low-intensity conflict between Israel and Iran that is targeting shipping continues to heat up. 

Iran unveils its newest drone creation

Tehran continues to invest heavily in long-range suicide drones. As to what level of cooperative capability they have at this time is debatable, but you don't need swarming abilities to oversaturate a highly defended target. Regardless, it's just a matter of time.

Bonus tweet/related:

New look at Iran's missile-packing catamaran under construction

A very unique and steampunk-ish angle on the Harrier

Here's the crapper on the Dragon capsule

Hey, when you gotta go, you gotta go!

Black Hawk takes a dip

It looks like this Black Hawk pilot got a bit overzealous when storming the drop zone. Scary stuff! 

More from UxS IBP 21

A long-range unmanned surface vessel (LRUSV) operates alongside Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Stockdale (DDG 106) in the Pacific Ocean during U.S. Pacific Fleet’s Unmanned Systems Integrated Battle Problem (UxS IBP) 21. 

U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Benjamin Forman

LRASM expansion

Lockheed's stealthy and wickedly smart anti-ship missile is now officially heading for land launch and the P-8 Poseidon. Both announcements are big news. LRASM is the most capable known anti-ship missile in America's arsenal. Being able to push them forward on the P-8, which we knew was on the Navy's wish list, brings another level of relevancy to the multi-mission jets, especially during a high-end conflict. Being able to deploy it in a coast defense role would make approaching within hundreds of miles of allied shores where it could be deployed a very risky proposition for the enemy. For instance, operating forward from islands in the Pacific, this system could be a critical defensive capability. 

Both announcements also open the door to new LRASM orders to America's closest allies, especially P-8 operators in higher-risk areas of the globe.

Littorally striking

The LCS program is beyond controversial, but this shot of the Independence-class USS Coronado looks like it is out of a science fiction movie. It is one of four LCSs slated for very early retirement. 

U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Shannon Renfroe

You're up to date! 

Contact the author: Tyler@thedrive.com