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Best Heated Gloves: Keep Your Hands Warm While Riding Your Motorcycle

These gloves are lifesavers when the temperature drops.

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BYNoelle Talmon/ LAST UPDATED ON March 24, 2022

The best part about winter riding is finally letting your hands cool off. Sure, it might ache a little, but there's nothing better than slowing your reaction times and reducing your ability to use certain controls effectively really spices things up. Sounds terrible, right? It should. If you're going to ride any kind of machine in the wintertime, making sure your hands are warm is something you can't afford to overlook. A set of heated gloves may not be cheap, but it's the best route to take if you intend to ride in wintry conditions. However, not all heated gloves are created equally. We put together this buying guide to help you find the best pair for your needs.

Best Overall

Gerbing 12V Vanguard Heated Gloves

Summary

These plug-in gloves are made of cowhide leather, feature Thinsulate insulation, and have a water-resistant and breathable membrane.

Pros
  • Consistent, warm heat
  • Leather-covered TPU knuckle protection
  • Touchscreen capable
Cons
  • Several elements need to be purchased separately
  • May not run true to size
Best Value

Joe Rocket 7V Rocket Burner Heated Gloves

Summary

These gloves are powered by lithium-ion batteries and provide four hours of warmth on the lowest heating and 2.5 hours on the highest.

Pros
  • Affordable
  • Waterproof and windproof
  • Touchscreen capable
Cons
  • Bulky
  • Minimal crash protection
  • Not ideal for long rides in freezing temps
Honorable Mention

Klim Hardanger HTD Long Gloves

Summary

Powered by lithium-ion batteries, these gloves provide heat for up to eight hours on the lowest setting.

Pros
  • GORE-TEX construction
  • CE Level 1 knuckle protection
  • Touchscreen capable
Cons
  • Pricey
  • Not as warm as plug-in gloves
Best Heated Gloves: Keep Your Hands Warm While Riding Your Motorcycle

Methodology

We took several factors into consideration when choosing the best heated gloves for motorcycling. First, we made sure to feature products from respected, well-known brands with a reputation for producing high-quality gear. High-quality construction was also important because heated gloves have mechanical elements, and they should be designed to last and not break after a short period of use. 

When it came to battery-powered gloves, we made sure to select products that provided heat for at least several hours on the lowest setting. And while heated gloves are not cheap, we made sure to include products with a range of prices to suit a variety of budgets. We also checked user feedback to see how these gloves perform in real-world conditions. We avoided gloves that were cheaply made or a little better than the non-heated gloves people wear for everyday cold weather tasks. For more information on our methodology, read more here.

Why Trust Us

Our reviews are driven by a combination of hands-on testing, expert input, “wisdom of the crowd” assessments from actual buyers, and our own expertise. We always aim to offer genuine, accurate guides to help you find the best picks.

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Best Heated Gloves Reviews & Recommendations

Product Specs

  • Plug-in operation
  • 26-watts or 2.2 amps of power consumption
  • Gauntlet design

Pros

  • Reaches temps up to 135 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Knuckle protection
  • Touchscreen capable

Cons

  • Heater controller, Y-cable, battery harness not included
  • May not be true to size
  • Controller feels bulky in your pocket

The Gerbing 12V Vanguard Gloves provide excellent warmth and protection at a reasonable price. These gloves are constructed of aniline cowhide leather with an Aquatex water-resistant and breathable membrane and Thinsulate insulation. This layout does an excellent job keeping the heat in and the cold out with a maximum temperature of 135 degrees Fahrenheit. The gloves plug into your bike's electrical system and provide consistent heat at all speeds, and they use Microwire technology to provide heat to all parts of your hands, including the fingertips, consuming up to 26 watts, or 2.2 amps, of power. The gloves also have leather-covered TPU knuckle protection and padded palms. Other features include touchscreen capability, adjustable cuffs, reflective elements, and reinforcements in the palms and edges. The gauntlet design allows them to fit nicely over your jacket sleeves, and they are pre-curved for comfort.

The biggest downside is the heat controller, Y-cable, and battery harness are not included, which drives up the cost. Also, they may not run true to size, so make sure you measure your hands properly and refer to reviews before making a purchase.


Product Specs

  • Operated by lithium-ion batteries
  • 7 volt
  • Nylon construction

Pros

  • Breathable, waterproof, and windproof
  • Touchscreen compatible
  • Heavy-duty materials

Cons

  • No crash protection
  • Cuff is narrow
  • Not for long rides in really cold temperatures

The Joe Rocket 7V Rocket Burner Heated Gloves are one of the most affordable heated gloves on the market. They come with two rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that are stored in a pocket under the wrist. The battery lasts four hours on the lowest heat setting, three hours on medium, and 2.5 hours on high. The gloves are made of heavy-duty nylon with a synthetic suede palm, and the Hipora liner is breathable, waterproof, and windproof. They are touchscreen compatible and feature an adjustable cuff closure, full-flex wrist for mobility, and a reinforced palm for added grip. And a charger with multiple ports is included. 


The downsides are that the gloves are a little bulky and don't provide much crash protection, such as armored knuckles, and the cuffs are a little narrow and difficult to get over a jacket. Also, the heating element is only on the top side of the glove, and they're better suited for shorter rides in cold weather versus long rides in freezing temperatures.

Product Specs

  • Operated by lithium-ion batteries
  • Three-level heating system
  • 3M insulation and GORE-TEX construction

Pros

  • Eight-hour battery life on low
  • CE Level 1 knuckle protection
  • Goat leather on the palms and fingers

Cons

  • Pricey
  • Not as warm as plug-in gloves

The Klim Hardanger HTD Long Gloves also use lithium-ion batteries for power, but they are designed to last as long as eight hours on the low setting, three hours on medium, and 1.5 hours on high. The gloves feature 3M Thinsulate insulation, GORE-TEX construction, and goat leather on the palms and fingers for durability. These gloves are a step above some of the other battery-powered options on our list as they have a longer battery life on the low setting and also include impact protection foam in the knuckles and palms. The knuckle protection is rated CE Level 1 and other features include a visor wiper, touchscreen compatibility, 3M Scotchlite reflective elements, an automatic heat timer, an entry-assist pull loop, a Velcro cuff closure, a comfort fleece liner, and hydrophobic treatment for waterproof protection. 


The biggest concern here is that these gloves are a little pricey, which is a big setback for many riders. Also, since they are battery operated, they're not as warm as most plug-in gloves.

Product Specs

  • Operated by lithium-ion batteries
  • Premium twill outer shell
  • Three heat settings

Pros

  • Breathable and water-resistant
  • Eight hours of warmth on lowest setting
  • Wide cuffs easily go over jacket sleeves

Cons

  • Not waterproof
  • Pricey
  • Battery and charger are sold separately

The Gerbing 7V S7 Gloves feature a premium twill outer shell and are powered by lithium-ion batteries in the cuffs that provide three heat settings: low, medium, and high. The gloves provide eight hours of warmth on the low setting, five hours on medium, and 2.5 hours on high. The temperature control is located in the cuffs, making it easy to adjust when you're on the bike and the insulated liner is windproof, while the gloves also feature a breathable, water-resistant membrane. They feature Gerbing Microwire technology that heats up the gloves and has reinforcements on the fingertips for grip and abrasion resistance. The cuffs are designed to go over your jacket's sleeves to prevent wind from penetrating. Other features include touchscreen capability in the index finger, reflective elements, and a TPU-molded cinch strap. 


Unfortunately, you have to purchase the 7-volt battery and charger separately, which drives up the price and can come as a shock to many. Speaking of price, these are also on the expensive side, which makes them a less-than-ideal choice for many. 

Product Specs

  • Plug-in heat
  • Leather and 600D textile construction
  • Compatible with Hotwired Heated Jacket Liner 2.0

Pros

  • Waterproof and breathable
  • Three temperature settings
  • Two-year warranty

Cons

  • High setting is a little too hot
  • Bulky
  • Don’t fit well over jacket sleeves

The Hotwired heated gloves are hard to beat if you're after heated gloves that won't take all of your lunch money. Constructed of leather and 600D abrasion-resistant textile fabric, these gloves have a waterproof and breathable membrane that will keep your hands warm on a brisk winter day. The gloves have a built-in temperature controller with three settings, so you can control the amount of heat they generate. They're designed to be used in conjunction with the pre-wired Hotwired Heated Jacket Liner 2.0, but you can wear them with other jackets as well. Other features include an automatic temperature cut-off, reflective elements, a pull-through wrist strap, and an adjustable cuff. The gloves consume 22 watts, or two amps, of power, and are backed by a two-year warranty. They heat up quickly and keep water and moisture out. 


As for the issues, the cuffs don't fit well over all types of jackets, so air can penetrate your wrists. They are a little bulky, they don't have touchscreen functionality, and they run a little hot on the highest temperature setting.

Product Specs

  • Operated by lithium-ion batteries
  • 7 volt
  • 3M Thinsulate with a Hipora liner

Pros

  • Durable
  • Touchscreen compatible
  • Breathable, waterproof, and windproof

Cons

  • No armor
  • Battery life is limited
  • Not for extremely cold temperatures

If you're looking for a pair of battery-powered gloves because you don't want to be tethered to your bike by wires or cables, then the Fly Racing Street 7V Ignitor Heated Gloves are a good option. They feature a lithium-ion battery with three heat settings and provide four hours of warmth on low, three hours on medium, and 2.5 hours on high. The gloves have 3M Thinsulate insulation and a breathable, waterproof, and windproof Hipora liner. There are leather elements on the fingers and palm for durability, and the gloves are touchscreen compatible. The gauntlet can be pulled over your coat to prevent air from getting into your sleeves, and the fingers are pre-curved for comfort. A 110-volt wall charger with dual charging ports and a storage bag are included.


It's important to note that these gloves are not armored, and, despite what that might suggest, they're not as dexterous as some rival options. They're best for shorter rides due to the battery life, and they can get quite wet if you ride in heavy rain or snow.

Our Verdict on Heated Gloves

Buying a pair of heated gloves is an investment, regardless of whether they are battery powered or plug into your bike’s electrical system. Our top overall pick is the Gerbing 12V Vanguard Heated Gloves because they provide a good amount of warmth and also provide knuckle protection, which many brands skimp out on. For a more budget-friendly option, consider the Joe Rocket 7V Rocket Burner Heated Gloves

What to Consider When Buying Heated Gloves

There are just two types of heated gloves: battery-powered and plug-in gloves. There are pros and cons to each option, which we detail below so you can make an informed buying decision. There are also several factors to consider before purchasing a pair of gloves, including the material construction, waterproofing abilities, and temperature controls.

Types of Heated Gloves

Battery-Powered

Some heated motorcycle gloves are battery-powered, making them a versatile option. You can wear them both on and off of the motorcycle and for other activities such as snowmobiling, snowshoeing, and winter hikes. The downside is that the batteries will eventually need to be recharged, so they have a limited operating time.

Plug-In/Wired

Wired or plug-in heated gloves are physically linked to your motorcycle. The gloves are attached to the bike with a wiring harness, and you need to unplug the gloves before you get off your bike. The benefit is that the gloves will stay warm as long as you ride, unlike battery-powered gloves that need to be recharged.

Heated Gloves Key Features

Fit

Measure your hands before purchasing a pair of heated motorcycle gloves to ensure they fit properly. Check the manufacturer's size chart based on your measurements. If the gloves are too tight, they will feel uncomfortable, and if they're too loose, you won't be able to feel the controls as well, which may cause safety issues.

Temperature Controls

Generally, heated gloves have three heat settings: low, medium, and high. With battery-operated gloves, this is particularly helpful because you can save power if you choose a lower heat setting. As for plug-in heated gloves, the controls may be on the actual gloves or on the wiring that attaches to your motorcycle.

Materials

Most heated motorcycle gloves are made of leather and synthetic materials that provide a thermal barrier against the wind. Leather is good because it can protect your hands from abrasion in the event of a crash; however, it's not the best in torrential rain or snow. That's why many heated gloves feature a combination of leather and nylon or other synthetic materials. Alternatively, the leather may be treated with a waterproof coating to keep your hands dry.

Protection

Materials used and levels of protection often need to be balanced. Again, leather is a great choice for abrasion protection, but it's not ideal under certain conditions. That said, a good set of gloves should at least offer reinforcement in the heel of the palm to protect your hands during an impact. It's also worth looking for protection in other areas, such as the fingers and knuckles if you intend to ride in rough conditions.

Waterproofing

Many heated motorcycle gloves have waterproof liners, which keep the wires protected from moisture. Alternatively, the outer layer may feature a waterproof coating to keep rain out. Either way, it's critical to have gloves that keep your hands dry as well as the battery and/or wiring so it doesn't malfunction.

Heated Gloves Pricing 

Heated gloves are expensive, but they're worth the investment. If you search hard enough, you can find a cheap pair of heated motorcycle gloves for under $100. However, that usually means low quality and performance, and you'll end up spending at least another $150 to $250 on a pair of decent gloves afterward. It's a lesson everyone will learn the hard way, but maybe you'll benefit from a heads-up.

Tips and Tricks

As with something you do for decades upon decades, you pick up a few tips and tricks along the way in terms of selecting the right product, and/or using it. That’s the case with us and heated gloves. To help you bridge the information gap, here’s a selection of what we’ve learned along the way.

  • If possible, avoid riding in heavy rain for long periods of time while wearing heated gloves. Water may penetrate the inner layers and damage the wiring.
  • If you have battery-powered gloves, charge them overnight. Some battery packs can take several hours to charge, and you want the gloves to be ready when you are.
  • You can also purchase a heated glove liner to fit inside the existing shell of your regular motorcycle gloves. 

FAQs 

You’ve got questions. The Drive has answers!

Q: Do heated motorcycle gloves work?

Yes. They keep your hands warm by promoting circulation and blood flow. They keep your hands dexterous and prevent them from going numb in cold temperatures.

Q: Are heated gloves worth it?

While they are bulkier than non-heated gloves, if you ride a motorcycle in cold temperatures, heated gloves can make the journey more comfortable.

Q: Can you wash heated gloves?

Yes, you can. First, remove the battery, and then spot clean them as necessary.

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