Best Bike Travel Cases: Carry Your Bike Wherever You Go

Use one of these travel cases to protect your bike on any trip

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A bike case makes it easy to transport your bike if you fly, use public transportation, or don't have a roof rack or a bike hitch rack for your vehicle. Simply disassemble the bike, load it in the case, and reassemble it once you get to your destination. In this buyer's guide, we feature the best travel cases for your trips.

  • Best Overall
    CyclingDeal Bike Case
    Summary
    Summary

    A hard case box made of lightweight material. Designed to transport road and mountain bikes.

    Pros
    Pros

    Durable. Comes with convenient roller wheels. Tear- and abrasion-resistant. Features thick sponges that protect the wheels and frame from damage. Includes buckles and straps for extra security.

    Cons
    Cons

    The wheels don’t last. May get dents after air travel. Cannot accommodate large e-bikes.

  • Best Value
    B&W International Bike Case
    Summary
    Summary

    A simple and affordable aluminium case that secures all the bike parts in one compartment.

    Pros
    Pros

    Lockable design.  Features a convenient pull-out handle. Can stand the blows of airport baggage handling. Weighs less than large hard cases. The reinforced interior protects the bike parts from damage.

    Cons
    Cons

    Doesn’t offer cushioning for the bike wheels. The case doesn’t come equipped with wheels for easy movement.

  • Honorable Mention
    Trico Iron Case
    Summary
    Summary

    A 31-pound, high-strength iron case with full straps and wheels for enhanced mobility.

    Pros
    Pros

    Damage-resistant. Features three cotton layers for maximum cushioning of the bike parts. Easy to pack. Minimal bicycle disassembly required. Has room for tools, a helmet, and aero bars. Fully lockable.

    Cons
    Cons

    Large road and triathlon bikes may not fit in the case. Securing the straps and locking the case may be challenging.

Tips

  • Carry your tools for reassembling the bike and pack them in the travel case. You should also carry a lubricant for the chain and gears in case the components dry out.
  • Even if you have an impact-resistant bag, handle it with care to prevent dents on the bike frame and cracks on the plastic parts.
  • Take a photo before disassembling the bike to know where everything needs to go when you put it back together. Also, mark the saddle height on the seat post. 
  • Make the most of the travel case. If there's any room left, pack it with your socks, charger, tools, and any other light material that can fit without damaging the bike. 

FAQs

Q: What parts of my bike need to be disassembled when I pack it in a travel case?

A: To get your bike to fit in a standard travel case, remove the handlebars, wheels, saddle, and pedals. Use a pedal wrench to remove the pedals. You should also lower the seat post and remove any accessories on the handlebars and bike frame. 

Q: Do airlines allow bike travel cases? 

A: Check with the airline to learn about their baggage weight limit, prices, and other policies. Some airlines have restrictions on the dimensions of travel cases. Call well in advance to ensure that they will accept the travel case on your travel date. 

Q: Can I pack my bike in a cardboard box instead of a travel case?

A: A cardboard box is the standard shipping method since it's inexpensive and light. It also keeps the bike safe if it's properly packed. However, cardboard boxes fall apart when wet and provide minimal impact protection. It's better to opt for a high-quality travel case if you want to transport your bike over long distances. 

Final Thoughts

We selected the durable and lightweight CyclingDeal Bike Case as our top pick because it’s one of the best cases for safely transporting your bike. 

If you don’t want to break the bank for a travel case, consider the B&W International Bike Case.