Your Private Garage Would Look Like Bruce Meyer’s Private Garage

Ferraris, the first Shelby Cobra, big-displacement race bikes and a Le Mans-winning turbo Porsche. This is what happens when someone like us hits it big.

Bruce Meyer is a man worth emulating. He’s a prominent old-car evangelist, co-founder of the Petersen Museum, with a proper racing résumé to boot: He holds a hot rod land speed record, and only recently gave up “serious” big-displacement motorcycle racing. Myers (not Bruce Meyers of dune buggy fame) is a player in the collector scene, too, but a relatively quiet one—a low-key guy, who was racing trials bikes during the On Any Sunday era before making it big in real estate. But don’t let the money fool you; he’s one of us. (Example: Myers won a cabinet of ribbons at Pebble Beach, at the same time bothering them until they let his beloved hot rods into the Concours). He’s machines first, everything else second. But he never really had a proper garage.

Instead, he kept a two-story converted shoe warehouse in Beverly Hills that he’d used as an office since 1968. When he turned 70, in 2010, he gave himself a little present: a private sanctuary. He never intended it to be well-known, but with completion coinciding with the Jay Leno celebrity car collector era, his friends have coaxed him out. It’s still not public, so a peek inside is a treat, considering it holds some of the most amazing cars in the world. That includes a lineup of important Ferraris, the first production 1962 Cobra and a Briggs Cunningham Le Mans Corvette. Also: The 1979 Porsche 935 that won Le Mans overall, which his buddy Bruce Canepa pretended to have seized by the DEA. Then there's the Wall Of Bikes...

The folks over at V3LLUM recently got the chance to take a tour of Meyer’s “garage,” and it’s approximately every automotive dream rolled into one. “It’s a fun place that I can enjoy with my friends,” he said. Here’s hoping Bruce wants more friends.