Sixteen Power's 14.0-Liter LS V-16 Engine Hits the Dyno

Any guesses on how much power this monster makes?

Sixteen Power

If you've ever wondered what would happen if someone fused together two LS V-8 engines to create a monster of a V-16, wonder no more. That’s exactly what the folks at Michigan-based Sixteen Power have done and they’ve just put their creation on the dyno to see what kind of power and torque ratings it can crank out. You can watch it roar on the dyno here.

First, a little background. This V-16 is based on the 7.0-liter (427 ci) LS7 V-8 that originally saw duty in the C6 Chevy Corvette Z06 and the fifth-generation Chevy Camaro Z/28. In stock form, an LS7 makes 505 horsepower and 470 pound-feet of torque making it the most powerful naturally aspirated engine that General Motors has ever put in a production car.

That distinction makes it an excellent candidate to be Frankensteined into a V-16. This engine has two LS7 blocks mated together into one block that accepts either production or aftermarket heads and intakes. Like any LS-based engine, the idea is to get muscular performance in a reliable, easily maintained package. The V-16 was actually designed to be a boat engine, but we have a feeling there are already builders with big dreams measuring the engine bays in their cars.

This V-16 was first unveiled back in February, but Sixteen Power just released a new video of the engine on a dyno. In what Sixteen Power calls a “mild state of tune,” its V-16 on its first day running makes 1,103 horsepower and 1,115 pound-feet of torque.

Those numbers are insane when compared to most engines, but we’ve seen (slightly) more impressive numbers from heavily modified LS V-8 engines before. We can’t help but wonder what some extra tweaks and forced induction would do for the performance of this wild V-16. Hopefully, we’ll find out soon.

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