It's so Hot in Australia That Roads Are Melting

Extreme heat is turning asphalt into a sticky mess in some parts of the continent, where it's currently summer.

Long Haul
Kokkai Ng—Getty Images

It may be cold in the Northeastern United States, but extreme heat in another part of the globe is causing difficulties that include melting asphalt on a major road in Australia.

Police in Australia's southeastern state of Victoria on Friday alerted motorists to anticipate delays and to stay clear of the right-hand lane of the Hume Freeway, due to a 10-kilometer stretch of road that is melting, NPR reported.

Officials explained that temperatures of 100 degrees Fahrenheit and above, mixed with heavy traffic, play havoc with a main ingredient in road surfaces, in this case creating sticky soft spots.

During the weekend, Victoria, South Australia, and Tasmania declared fire bans as emergency management agencies readied for hot, dry and windy conditions, according to local news reports.

People were urged to remain indoors and to refrain from playing sports amid extreme heat across the three states in southeast Australia.

The country is subject to deadly fires due to Australia's mix of remote terrain, hot summers, and eucalyptus bush, which easily catches fire, the Independent explained.

Australia's winter, which occurs June to August, was the hottest on record, according to the country's Bureau of Meteorology, which chalked it up a long-term warming trend and largely the result of climate change.