Flying Somewhere for the Holidays? Tips from the FAA for Packing Safely

Everyday items are among those included on a list of hazardous materials on an airplane, FAA says.

Include airline passengers' weight in luggage allowance, two in five say
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Flying somewhere for the holidays and want to bring a curling iron? That's fine, so long as you bring it in a carry-on bag, and not in a piece of checked luggage.

Common toiletries such as nail polish and hair spray can be viewed as a hazardous material on an airplane, so the Federal Aviation Administration is advising passengers to check out the agency's website before packing your bags.

E-cigarettes, vaping devices and spare lithium batteries should not be packed in check luggage. The type of lithium batteries used in personal electronic devices can travel with you, but only in carry-on luggage. 

That's because electronic devices powered by lithium batteries can catch fire, and devices that smoke are much easier to extinguish in the cabin of a plane than they are in the cargo hold. Therefore, the FAA asks that passengers keep cell phones and other devices nearby in the cabin, so they can be quickly accessed, if needed.

Still, even in carry-on luggage, spare lithium batteries should be covered in tape and placed in separate bags if not sealed in manufacturer packaging, according to the federal agency.

Other common items that travelers may plan on packing but could prove hazardous include: aerosol cans that may contain deodorant, tanning spray or animal repellant; artist paints; and glues.