GM Workers Strike at Ingersoll, Ontario Plant

General Motors and Unifor Local 88 failed to come to an agreement on a new contract.

Chevrolet

Despite weeks of negotiations, 2,750 workers at General Motors' CAMI Automotive plant in Ingersoll, Ontario, walked off the job as their contract expired Sunday. 

Despite weeks of negotiations, GM and Unifor Local 88, the union representing plant workers, failed to come to an agreement on a new contract, resulting in the strike.

This brings production of the Chevy Equinox, GM's top-selling SUV, to a near standstill. Though a small number are made in Mexico, the vast majority are built at CAMI plant and is the only model the plant currently builds. Production of its Theta platform mate, the GMC Terrain, was moved to Mexico in July, resulting in the loss of 600 jobs at Ingersoll. Job security for those who remain is the top concern for Local 88, according to a statement on the union's website.

"While General Motors of Canada and our Unifor partners have made very positive progress on several issues over the past weeks, the Company is disappointed that we were not able to complete a new agreement," GM said in a statement to Automotive News. "We encourage Unifor to resume negotiations and to continue working together to secure a competitive agreement."

Other GM plants in Canada are not affected by this strike, as they received new four-year contracts last year. The CAMI plant was originally a joint venture between GM and Suzuki until GM bought out Suzuki's interest in 2009. As a result, workers at the CAMI plant are on a separate contract from those who work at other plants in Canada.

This is the first Canadian strike against an American auto manufacturer since 1996. That strike was also against GM amid concerns of jobs at plants in Ontario.