Ex-Nissan Chairman Carlos Ghosn Offers Passport, Stock for Bail: Report

The jailed businessman also volunteered to wear an electronic ankle bracelet that tracks his location.

Carlos Ghosn, Renault CEO Gives A Press Conference In Paris
Christophe Morin/IP3—Getty Images

Dismissed Nissan Chairman Carlos Ghosn, arrested for alleged financial crimes, has reportedly offered up significant collateral so he may post bail while awaiting trial.

After his first request for bail was denied, Ghosn allegedly volunteered to give up his passports and shares in Nissan for allowance to stay with his family in their Tokyo apartment. Additionally, Reuters reports he promised to pay a higher bail amount (whose amount was unspecified), wear an electronic anklet to track his location, report to local authorities daily, and avoid contact with any potential witnesses in the case.

"I remain imprisoned in the detention center, 64 days after I was arrested, with no release in sight," said Ghosn in a statement released Sunday on his behalf. "As the Court considers my bail application, I want to emphasize that I will reside in Japan and respect any and all bail conditions the Court concludes are warranted."

Motonari Otsuru, Ghosn's lawyer, predicts that Ghosn will remain locked up until the trial begins, which is expected to occur in approximately six months.

The former executive has been in jail since his arrest on Nov. 19, 2018, and subsequent dismissal from Nissan shortly thereafter, prompted by allegations that Ghosn under-reported his income to reduce his taxes. During his internment, Ghosn has allegedly been subjected to hours of interrogation, abuse, and derision at the hands of investigators, all without an attorney present—so says Ghosn's wife, who also claims Carlos has been under-nourished and denied his medication.

Ghosn's legal tribulations worsened on Jan. 11 when instead of being released as scheduled, two new charges came his way, keeping him being bars. These included an alleged offloading of Ghosn's financial problems onto Nissan—an aggravated breach of trust—along with an expanded range of years during which Ghosn and his aide Greg Kelly was said to have under-reported the exec's income.