Toyota to Throttle Back Camry Production at Kentucky Plant Amid Poor Sales

Meanwhile, the Toyota RAV4 is a hot commodity that's flying off dealership lots.

Toyota Motor North America

Despite a well-received redesign and boasting the title of America's best-selling sedan for the last 16 years, the Toyota Camry is having a rough time in the sales arena—and it appears that crossovers and SUVs are to blame. More importantly, the sales slowdown has led Toyota to throttle back production at its Kentucky plant next month.

Toyota

According to Bloomberg, three assembly lines produce the Camry, along with the larger Avalon and the Lexus ES sedans, and one of those three lines will see reduced production starting in December. It's not the Camry's fault, though, as its main segment competitor, the Honda Accord, has also seen reduced sales.

Sedan sales, in general, have slumped as the industry (and the consumer) moves towards crossovers as volume vehicles. Indeed, Toyota's RAV4 has overtaken the Camry in sales, becoming Toyota's number one seller in the United States.

Toyota

It's a shame that the Camry, which has long been the butt of jokes among enthusiasts and enthusiast-minded auto journalists alike, has finally come into its own as a good car to drive and own. No longer just a dull—if reliable, beige appliance—the current Camry is an engaging daily driver for people who value safety, reliability, and resale value as much as they value having a decent time behind the wheel.

Sadly, it seems that sedan drivers are a rapidly dying breed, and both manufacturers and car buyers are becoming increasingly enamored with the crossover. Heck, even luxury sports car maker Aston Martin is working on one.

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