Aston Martin CEO Not Worried About Future of Internal Combustion Amidst EV Surge

While some believe the gas engine is on its deathbed, Palmer thinks there's still a lot of life left in the design.

Max Earey/Aston Martin

Aston Martin CEO Andy Palmer doesn't subscribe to the idea that we’re witnessing the death of the internal combustion engine—he thinks it's only hype. He also believes that politicians need to step aside and let carmakers find a fix for automotive-related pollution. 

This and then some was said during a recent CNBC interview where the Brit showed his confidence in the car industry and, particularly, the enthusiast side of it all. In the sit-down, Palmer expressed that automotive engineers will be the ones who can solve concerns over auto emissions, not politicians.

"As far as I know politicians are not that great at science,” said Palmer. "I don't think the internal combustion engine will die any time soon.”

He used this topic to highlight the idea that there is still a long way to go with the development of gasoline powerplants. However, this doesn’t mean Aston Martin is backing out of the electric arena as it's set to release EV and hybrid cars soon; the British brand has an all-electric RapidE heading to the market in 2019. Additionally, the company's uber-luxury marque, Lagonda, is also getting an electrified option shortly after. The company isn’t shying away from the use of electric powertrains, but it's not giving up on the gasoline-powered vehicles. 

"Electric vehicles are good in some circumstances, but the internal combustion engine and, in particular, the gasoline engine still has a lot of life left in it,” he added.

Aston Martin's stance on gasoline engines doesn’t come as a surprise as it has long been a supporter of manual transmissions, while many others are abandoning the feature entirely. In all, the dedication to driving pleasure is apparent with the Palmer-led business.

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