One-Off, Extremely Expensive Koenigsegg Agera RS Crashes During Testing—Again

It's time we start talking curses here.

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Pick a car, any car, and no matter how rare or expensive, you can bet that someone has wrecked it. And that's doubly true for this unlucky, one-off Koenigsegg Agera RS, which just crashed for the second time in a year during road testing in Sweden, according to pictures posted on Teknikens Värld.

Koenigsegg unveiled the special Agera RS Gryphon at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show, featuring a body made entirely of carbon fiber, real 24-karat gold leaf trim, and a near 1:1 power-to-weight ratio at 1,360 horsepower and 1,395 kilograms (that's 3,075 pounds). One of its most expensive cars ever, it was built for U.S.-based car collector Manny Khoshbin, who unfortunately never got to enjoy it—a Koenigsegg factory driver buried the Gryphon in a ditch during final testing in May 2017.

That's not a phone call we'd like to make or receive. Still, both Khoshbin and Koenigsegg made the best of it: the company commenced work on a replacement Agera RS (which would ultimately be the last one produced) for its client and opted to fix up the smashed supercar for use as a factory test and demonstration unit.

Unfortunately, it seems fate has other plans for the fastest production car in the world. On Thursday, just over a year to the day of its first crash, the cursed Agera RS wrecked again. An extremely blurry picture over on Teknikens Värld shows the multimillion-dollar, one-of-one car resting at an awkward angle on the far side of a roadside ditch. It looks like the driver somehow lost control on a straightaway and crashed through the bottom of the drainage channel; the reader who sent in the picture added that tire marks suggest the car had spun before leaving the pavement.

Why this happened isn't clear. The car appears to have had its original wing and rear fender vents removed, though it's hard to imagine a company like Koenigsegg putting an unstable car on the road, even in testing. The body doesn't look too damaged, but the undercarriage and suspension are probably a different story.

Adding insult to injury, Teknikens Värld reports that this was the very first time the repaired Agera RS had been driven since the first crack-up. Whatever Koenigsegg was testing on Thursday, it's back to the drawing board for this iteration.

Swedish supercar maker Koenigsegg is selling 25 U.S. street legal versions of its Agera RS model.
The Drive